Mike Mazzarone

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Bio: Mike Mazarone graduated from the Connecticut School of Broadcasting in 2011 with a degree in communications, basically relegating him to better then you status (Except for boss Brett Buchanan). Before joining the AlternativeNation staff he was a contributor and producer to Brett Buchanan’s pro wrestling/MMA/comedy radio show – Barbaric Wrestling Radio, from 2006 to 2009. Mazzarone’s job there was to be a contributor and book interviews. After the show ended Buchanan hired Mazzarone right away to be AlternativeNation's head reporter. Contact: MJMazarrone (at) yahoo.com or; mike (at) alternativenation.net

In a new interview with the Red Bulletin, Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl spoke his mind about the current state of music, claiming rock fans rely too much on the internet.

“People have forgotten what it’s like to really rock out because they spend all day in front of a freakin’ computer, which they hail as the new God.”

Grohl then continued:

“They seriously think technology can make them rich, if they stumble on something new. But I’m telling you: technology might make you rich, yet it will never make you happy.”

In a new Q&A with Rolling Stone, Grohl ripped critics of the Foo Fighters latest studio album Sonic Highways:

Look, that was one of the first conversations that we had when we started this project. I would explain the idea and someone would say, “Oh, cool. So, are you going to play a blues song? Are you going to make a country song in Nashville? Are you going to do jazz in New Orleans?” And I thought, “Can you fucking imagine how much of a train wreck that would be?” I said, “You have to remember that not everybody has HBO and is going to see the series.”

So, first and foremost, we have to make a Foo Fighters record. That’s it. And I really fought to retain that. At one point in Nashville, I walked in the control room and everyone was wearing fucking cowboy hats. I was like, “Guys! Don’t! Stop! Wait! We are still the Foo Fighters. Don’t forget that.” I think maybe people misunderstood the concept and thought that we were going to incorporate all of the different flavors or genres from each city, and, to me, it didn’t make any sense because the last thing I want to do is chase something that’s not real.

Grohl also said:

“You’re like, Hey, I’ve done this thing! Fuck, I can’t wait for people to hear this! I’m so proud of it. It was such a blast to do.” You get excited and then you realize that people didn’t really understand it in the first place. So you’re like, “Aw, fuck it.” It’s one of those things that after 20 years, nothing is going to keep us from doing what we do. And there’s not much to discourage us from the path that we’ve been on for this long. Look, if some dude with a blog says the band blew it because we didn’t fucking put a lap steel [guitar] on our song in Nashville, then that same day you sell out Wembley Stadium in a day, it’s like, “OK, well, I guess we’re doing something right.”

In a new interview with NME, Royal Blood drummer Ben Thatcher discussed how much opening for the Foo Fighters means to him:

“If you asked us individually before Royal Blood even started with band we’d most like to tour with the Foo Fighters would be the ones,” Thatcher told the magazine. “So to get the opportunity on this album run is insane.”

Mike Kerr, guitarist of the group discussed on the band’s plans for the new year:

“We just want it to flourish musically and make sure we’re always getting the best out of ourselves,” he said. “As long as we’re doing that, everything else doesn’t really matter. This is still an exciting project for us. I can’t really hope for anything. I don’t really need anything.”

Royal Blood will be supporting the Foo Fighters on the following tour dates:

7/6/15 – Camden, NJ – Susquehanna Bank Center
7/9/15 – Toronto, ON – Molson Canadian Amphitheatre
7/16/15 – New York, NY – Citi Field
7/19/15 – Boston, MA – Fenway Park

8/12/15 – Edmonton, AB – Rexall Place
8/13/15 – Calgary, AB – Scotiabank Saddledome
8/17/15 – Denver, CO – Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre
8/19/15 – Maryland Heights, MO – Verizon Wireless Amphitheater
8/21/15 – Kansas City, MO – Sprint Center
8/22/15 – St. Paul, MN – Xcel Energy Center
8/24/15 – Detroit, MI – DTE Energy Music Theatre
8/25/15 – Pittsburgh, PA – First Niagara Pavilion

Jack White was once part of a band called the Upholsters, the joie being that Muldoon and White were legitimate upholsters in the trade and renovated furniture for a living. Back in 2004, the band would release singles by sewing copies into pieces of different furniture, all without telling the customers anything.

Third man says that out of 100 copies of the hidden 2004 single, entitled “Apple Of My Eye”, only two were found. Both by completely different people. Third man has now shared photos of the art which you can view below, along with the track itself.

Uphold2

In other White news, Mike McCready’s interview with Jack White aired on Pearl Jam Radio on SiriusXM recently. White and McCready talked about Pearl Jam bringing back the blues, and why the blues influence is lacking in rock today. Here is our transcription.

White said, “We were just saying on the bus a couple days about Pearl Jam, our bass player Dominic who is playing with me was saying, it was so great when we were in high school when a double guitar band came out with Pearl Jam, and how nice it was to see that. It had blues undertones throughout it, because there was punk bands, and heavy metal bands, but at that time, in the late 80’s, it didn’t seem like there were that many rock and roll bands. The rock and roll was sort of like Guns N’ Roses, that was the rock and roll of that moment. So it was great to see a double guitar band that had that bluesy feeling to it because we were kind of grasping at straws, taking whatever we could, because there really wasn’t anybody doing that.”

He added, “I think that when people say about modern music, ‘What is wrong with modern music? Where is rock and roll at?’ The hard part is that, even if you see bands on MTV now, there are these bands that have guitar, bass, and drums, and they’re the formation of a rock and roll band, but they don’t have any blues undertones or references in their mind to fall back into. Which is sort of, it’s okay and everything, but I think that the ones that have a little taste of that, 10% inside of knowing where the roots of this all came from, somehow they’re able to do something more interesting. Because if painters nowadays, if you work in Photoshop, maybe you can make something beautiful, but if you’ve never actually gone into a dark room and worked with the materials and developed the film, or worked with some kind of analog mechanical means to get that, you’re missing out on a big part of what you do as an art form.”

Mike McCready said, “I agree with that, and thank you for the Pearl Jam stuff. Myself, I got to see Stevie Ray Vaughan play 4 times, and the big turning point for me was seeing Muddy Waters on The Last Wall on Channel 9 one night by accident. I was way into metal, and I still love metal, but I was like, okay, I don’t need to play it that fast any more.”

The Foo Fighters latest promotional stop on the Sonic Highways tour brought them to The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon where they band delivered a dramatic version of “I Am A River” with a full orchestra. You can view the video below:

In other Foo Fighter news, Paul McCartney discussed working with Dave Grohl and if he would be open to doing his own UK version of Foo Fighters’ Sonic Highways concept in an interview with XFM. “I like what Dave does…his enthusiasm comes over.

“He told me the idea months ago, before he started on the series and I thought it was quite a brave idea because of the end of the week he’s got to come up with a song.”

“But it’s good to have a deadline if you’re a brave soul – which he is!”

Sir Paul was hesitant though when asked if he’d do a UK version of Sonic Highways.

“I wish I had the time. There’s so much history in something like Abbey Road – forget it! It goes right back, way back before us.

“I’m doing a lot of stuff and I love it – but I’ve also got a life beyond work, so I probably wouldn’t have time. But it’s a good idea!”

McCartney fronted Nirvana in 2012 for select live performances of their Grammy winning collaboration “Cut Me Some Slack,” which was part of the Sound City soundtrack.

“It was magic for me playing with these guys,” McCartney told Rolling Stone earlier this year. “I knew who Dave was because I’d met him, and he said ‘I have a couple of friends coming along.’ And during the session I hear them talking: ‘Wow, we haven’t played since Nirvana.’ So I found myself in the middle of a Nirvana reunion.”

He added that they could collaborate again “You never know. They really are great to play with. They were a great band with Kurt. That’s what I experienced – just playing with a really good band, which is a very special thing. I should know.”

Dead Sara have announced the details of their upcoming studio album “Pleasure To Meet You” via the band’s official Facebook page:

We are delighted to tell you that our forthcoming newwww album “Pleasure To Meet You” is now available to pre-order!!!

It will be released in late March 2015 and you can order it here first PLUS a load of other awesome items with it.

Those of you who pre-order it we will be getting lots and lots of free bonus content and treats….. starting with a FREE download of the opening track off the record “Suicidal”.

So excited this is finally getting out to you guys and stay tuned for upcoming news on our new music video and single and much much more!

Love,

Em, Sioux, Sean and Chris

http://www.pledgemusic.com/projects/deadsara

Last month, AlternativeNation.net had the chance to interview Dead Sara frontwoman Emily Armstrong. With rock and roll at one of its lowest points, Armstrong is one of the genre’s greatest hopes as it eyes a comeback from the dead, with her gut wrenching voice definitely being one of the best to come out in the last decade.

When asked if rock is dead and if it could come back, Armstrong had an optimistic outlook. “I think it always comes back. If history has taught us anything, it does die out, and then comes back. There’s just like a certain wave of rock and roll I think, and right now we’re just at a decline, just like how the 80’s died, and then Grunge came in. There’s only a few that were sticking around in the late 80’s, like Guns N’ Roses and stuff like that, and then you had the Grunge scene that came in, then everybody in rock and roll was big again, there were so many bands that people loved. I think history repeats itself, and there’s no way that could really end. I can’t say it’s going to, or it’s not, but it’s just from what I’ve learned, and what I hope. It’s what I live for, so whether people buy it or not, who fucking cares? I’ll still be doing it.”

The second album was recorded at a big house in Malibu, and features the track “Mona Lisa,” which had a video filmed for it last month. “Radio 1 2″ is Armstrong’s favorite track from the record.

Armstrong sang backing vocals on Courtney Love’s 2010 Hole album Nobody’s Daughter. When asked what she learned from Love, Armstrong said, “Just stay sane, never do drugs.” She added, “I think the learning part was listening to her records, and the icing on the cake was to meet her, and sing on her record, that was the awesome part.”

While Dead Sara are only one album (soon to be two) into their career so far, Armstrong envisions the band will have a strong catalog under their belt a decade from now, “Well hopefully we’ll have 5 more records out at least, and touring. In 10 years, we’ll be in our 30’s by then. I think that’s a good time to be on top of our game, and then some.”

Noel Gallagher had some choice words for Arctic Monkeys in a new interview with BBC Radio Four’s Mastertapes.

He went on to say: “Arctic Monkeys and Kasabian, that’s 10 years ago now and shame on those two bands for a start because they didn’t inspire anybody else. The working classes have not got a voice anymore, there doesn’t seem to be a noise coming from the council estates, you know what I mean?”

The former Oasis member lashed out at modern rock act Bastille:

“Music is very middle class, I’d have eaten Bastille alive in an afternoon in the ’90s, one interview, destroyed, gone, never to be heard of again. Easy, had ‘em for breakfast. My bass player summed it up, we’re constantly saying, ‘Where is the next band coming from?’ and he rightly says, ‘Never mind the band, where are the people? When I first started I wanted to get in the charts and wreck it, like stamp Phil Collins out and Wet Wet Wet, they’ve got to go, and all that ’80s gear, we don’t need that anymore. I don’t see anything from the working class, I just don’t see it

Gallagher also disclosed that there is a bunch of unused Oasis tracks still left over:

“I’ve never written for a specific project, I’ve never been in the studio with less than 30 songs. I’ve just recorded an album, but I’ve still got another 30 songs. Instead of writing 15 or 16 songs for a cycle of where (Oasis) were at, we were using five, but I was still writing 15, 20 songs, so there’s loads of stuff left over from those days. Albums and albums worth of material. Because you move so fast as a writer, and you can only really do ten songs on an album at a time, lots get left behind.”

In other Gallagher related news, Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl discussed Oasis in a recent interview with XFM.

“The whole Oasis thing is a shame,” Grohl said. “We all love Oasis. We’ve played shows with them before, where I look at them and think ‘That’s the greatest rock band I’ve ever seen in my life’.

“To know that they’re out there somewhere but they won’t come together to do the thing that everybody would love so much…”

Grohl later added: “They’re fun. They have such a crazy reputation of being ‘the Oasis guys’, and then you see them at the bar and they show you pictures of their kids. And you’re like, ‘Wow, they’re just normal dudes’, y’know?”

Liam Gallagher recently announced the break up of Beady Eye over the weekend on Twitter. Beady Eye featured former Oasis members Liam Gallagher, Gem Archer, Andy Bell, and Chris Sharrock. Kasabian’s Jay Mehler also joined the band playing bass on tour last year. Beady Eye formed following Oasis’ breakup and released two albums: 2011’s Different Gear, Still Speeding and 2013’s BE.

Liam has claimed that he would be opening to reuniting Oasis with his brother Noel for a lot of money, but the brothers have trashed each other in the press in recent years, though they apparently made up earlier this year. Here are some of the Gallagher Brothers’ quotes regarding Oasis’ breakup.

Liam Gallagher (Daily Star, 2011):

“The people that go: ‘Oh, Beady Eye is not Oasis,’ well, Noel’s music ain’t Oasis either,” he said. “It might remind you of it but there’s something missing – fucking me.”

Liam Gallagher (Q 2011):

“Listen, [Noel]‘s a mouthy fuck too. He said we had a year to come up with a band name and came up with Beady Eye. He had three and came up with the High Flying Turds. I don’t know who dressed him but he looks like something out of Westlife.”

Liam Gallagher (The Guardian 2011):

”That’s the thing that makes me want to throw up. I just look at him now and think, ‘You’re a fucking fake’.”

Noel Gallagher (Press Conference 2011):

“On the way out [of the dressing room in 2009, Liam] picked up a plum and he threw it across the dressing room and it smashed against the wall. Part of me wishes it did end like that, that would have been a great headline. Then he kind of leaves, he goes out the dressing room, for whatever reason he went to his own dressing room and he came back with a guitar and he started wielding it like an axe and I’m not fucking kidding. And I’m making light of it because it’s kind of what I do, but it was a real unnecessary violent act, and he’s swinging this guitar around, he nearly took my face off with it.”

Liam Gallagher (Twitter 2011):

“[In respond to press conference quote] SHITBAG!”

Liam Gallagher (Daily Mail 2011):

“I’m quite prepared to go head to toe (sic) verbally, physically, musically, mentally with Noel Gallagher.”

Liam Gallagher (Lawsuit Statement 2011):

“I am used to being called all sort of things by Noel and I have in the past said things about him, but what Noel has alleged this time went way beyond rock-and-roll banter and questioned my professionalism.” He added, “This is not about money, all I want is a full apology from Noel.”

Noel Gallagher (NME 2012):

“[I wouldn’t reunite Oasis], not even if all the starving children in the world depended on it.”

Noel Gallagher (BBC6 2012):

“[Liam]‘s like a squeaky toy that swears a lot… in a blazer.”

Liam Gallagher (Q 2013):

“Fuck Oasis as far as I’m concerned and fuck Noel Gallagher. The thought of going onstage with that fucking idiot and hanging out with his daft mates, the pretend drug addicts and all his snobs from Sloane Street. Fuck that, not interested, mate.”

Liam Gallagher (NME 2013):

“If you want to play fucking Oasis songs put the band back together and stop being a fucking gobshite.”

Liam Gallagher (Clash Music 2013):

“The fuckin’ geezer that’s in the band? I fuckin’ absolutely fuckin’ despise [Noel when he’s in the band]. And I guess he feels the same way. But if you speak to him, he’ll probably go: ‘Yeah, I know; I hate both the cunts’. But yeah, I love our kid when he’s not surrounded by the bullshit.”

 

Last night, Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan performed a surprised acoustic set at Las Vegas based record store Zia Eastern. You can view photos and video from the event below:

Photo credit @ZiaRecords

CorganVegas CorganVegas1 Corganvegas2





In other BillCo news, in a recent piece with NME, Corgan discussed his take on staying relevant in today’s music industry and his displeasure for nostalgia:

“I had grown very frustrated with that widening gap between rock and roll and music where you have to get to the chorus within the first ten seconds or I’m gonna start taking a selfie. I had to really realize that the game had changed during my twenty something years and that I was facing the same kind of challenged that I had faced when I was making an album like Siamese Dream against hair metal bands of the world. You have to look at what the enemy is, in this case, time or attention spans and just go straight at it. The song’s the thing and it’s funny because if I listen to a Beatles song I like I’ll realize that the song begins with the vocals! No intro, just right into the chorus. So I took lessons from things like that.”

Corgan then added:

“I think of all the data of touring around the last seven years, seeing what music sticks and doesn’t we were pretty clear on that if we didn’t update what we were doing then we were pretty much dead in the water. I can’t speak for Europe as much, although I have played over there a lot the past few years, but America is very much stuck on the sentimental idea of what grunge was and what rock and roll was. You literally can phone in the same record over and over again and the public is actually OK with it. That creeps me out personally but that’s sort of the choice you’re given, do you update, come forward and get in there with the kids and get people on the dance floor or you might as well get on an oldies circuit, get on those package tours and play the hits. Which, to me, is like a form of slow motion suicide. It’s got nothing to do with why I started a band or am in a band and I rather not face oblivion in that type of way. I rather do a record like monuments, take a shot at it, if it doesn’t work then it doesn’t work but at least I’m on my feet trying.”

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan discussed the state of Smashing Pumpkins fans in a new interview with the Wall Street Journal:

“Honestly I think the fanbase is gone. I know it’s a prickly way to put it, but I don’t think there are fans anymore. I would define a fan as someone who explores the depth of the artist’s work, and allows the artist to show you something. It’s not up to the artist to walk you by the hand. I don’t think there are that many of those people who exist. I’d say they’re in the low thousands.”

Corgan went on to say

“(Based on) Feedback, web traffic, whatever you want to look at. This is where I start to complain, but I think the depth of my work and the depth of my catalogue is just now beginning to be explored in the way it was intended to. For whatever reason–cultural shifts or my own need to shift my public personalities–I have not gotten the cultural review worthy of my position. With the tenure I have, and the work and the reissues piling up, there’s going to have to be some kind of reckoning with me in the culture, because I just won’t f—ing go away. You know what I mean? When you look at my generation, I come out on the leaner side of the conversation about people who actually survived, and prospered and continued on. My position as an artist has basically not changed in a world where even Pavement started doing reunion tours. All the people who walked around puffing out their chests about the word integrity? A lot of those people are long f—-ng gone.”

In a new piece with NME, Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan discussed his take on staying relevant in today’s music industry and his displeasure for nostalgia:

“I had grown very frustrated with that widening gap between rock and roll and music where you have to get to the chorus within the first ten seconds or I’m gonna start taking a selfie. I had to really realize that the game had changed during my twenty something years and that I was facing the same kind of challenged that I had faced when I was making an album like Siamese Dream against hair metal bands of the world. You have to look at what the enemy is, in this case, time or attention spans and just go straight at it. The song’s the thing and it’s funny because if I listen to a Beatles song I like I’ll realize that the song begins with the vocals! No intro, just right into the chorus. So I took lessons from things like that.”

Corgan then added:

“I think of all the data of touring around the last seven years, seeing what music sticks and doesn’t we were pretty clear on that if we didn’t update what we were doing then we were pretty much dead in the water. I can’t speak for Europe as much, although I have played over there a lot the past few years, but America is very much stuck on the sentimental idea of what grunge was and what rock and roll was. You literally can phone in the same record over and over again and the public is actually OK with it. That creeps me out personally but that’s sort of the choice you’re given, do you update, come forward and get in there with the kids and get people on the dance floor or you might as well get on an oldies circuit, get on those package tours and play the hits. Which, to me, is like a form of slow motion suicide. It’s got nothing to do with why I started a band or am in a band and I rather not face oblivion in that type of way. I rather do a record like monuments, take a shot at it, if it doesn’t work then it doesn’t work but at least I’m on my feet trying.”

 

 

In a recent interview with the Howard Stern Show, Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan discussed how he met Courtney Love:

I was on a record label, they sent a box of music and one of the singles was Courtney’s. I flipped over the record, look at her on the back and said “I need to meet this woman.” I never heard of her, her name, I just looked at the picture and had to meet that woman. I called the person at the record record company and said, “I need to meet this woman.” It was even before I heard the music, I saw the picture and knew I had to meet her.  The only other time I’ve felt a feeling like that is for my friend Sasha Gray, the former porn star. In the case of Courtney, I called the woman at the record label, kind of arranged her to stay at my apartment when her band came through town and that started this whole insanity. 

Corgan then recollected the time when he threw Courtney Love out of his apartment:

She did this thing where she called me and asked “Do you want to see me?” and I’m a guy, of course I want to, so five hours later the phone rings and she says, “I’m at the O’Haire Chicago airport.” I had a girlfriend! It was like, “Yeah, I don’t want to see you today”. So boom, she’s at the door, all dressed up and then I had to kick her out. Courtney was a typhoon back in day. Back in the day Courtney was smokin’ hot, she’s still a very attractive woman but back in the day, you know, she was indie style, wearing the baby-doll dresses, I mean come on. It was like an indie fantasy.”

Stern then asked what the sex with Love was like. To which Corgan replied:

It was mythical. Just, kind of mythic.

Yesterday, AlternativeNation.net correspondent Dustin ‘Whip’ Halter was able to ask Alice In Chains’ singer/guitarist William Duvall a couple of questions via Duvall’s Facebook. Here are Dustin’s questions and Duvall’s answers. It should be noted that Duvall responded in multiple Facebook posts.

Halter:When I was 14 years old I was accosted, attacked by 4 black MEN on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (no less) for no other reason than the fact that I was white. I was punched, kicked, STOMPED– who knows what else because I blacked out after the stomping. This was never made a national case. I didn’t protest, hell, there wasn’t even an article in the city paper. And this is why (or a large majority of why) I have zero pity on the “plight,” of a people that think they are all innocent, falsely accused, and condescended upon without reason. SO while the penalty for the actions of some is severe, the penalties for MOST is none and karma has a way of working that out– and that goes for all races, genders, creeds, and especially the ones that think they don’t deserve it. I agree completely, while individuals shouldn’t be boiled down to one thing because of their race or sexual orientation, etc., statistics don’t lie, nor is it racist, sexist, or otherwise to use them, OR to take them into account when you’ve got nothing else to go by.

Do I want justice for the broken bones, brain damage, and emotional pain that I was subjected to some 17 years ago AND still suffering from today? I’ll never get what I deserve and it’s never going to happen anyway, so why rile a bunch of people up, potentially bring about the destruction of the homes and businesses of innocent people, and risk the lives of our public servants all for me? Plus.. black on white crime isn’t really that interesting, so I’ve found.  I love Alice in Chains, but the intended (and even unintended) reaction from this little nugget really turns my stomach, William Duvall. We all have a cross to bear, but it doesn’t mean you have to go hang yourself on it. Also, sorry my first comment on your page is this one because I have so much love, admiration, and respect for you for helping keep my favorite band in this world going. All social BS aside– you are beyond awesome at your job.”

Duvall:I am truly sorry for what happened to you. And you seem to be a thoughtful person. But your analysis of the big picture completely discounts the entire history of this country. In so doing, it discounts how that history, now hundreds of years long, DIRECTLY impacts what is going on today. The thousands of people demonstrating across this nation right now are not doing so over nothing (anymore than they were 50 years ago or 100 years ago, when they were also berated with cries of “race-baiting” and “crying over nothing”). This is a SYSTEMIC problem. It is centuries old. There are plenty of sources and statistics I could cite to illustrate this. But, beyond all the numbers and the rhetoric, there is this simple immutable reality: You have to IMAGINE a world where you, your father, or your son could be choked to death by 6 police officers on national television and there is not even an INDICTMENT brought. I have to LIVE in it.

Halter:I appreciate your empathy, William Duvall, I honestly do. The fact is, though, I grew up in a town where blacks loathed whites, beat them up without provocation, and destroyed the once-beautiful town that my parents inherited from theirs. When I was about 9 or 10 in the late 80’s my question to my mother was, “why do black people hate us so much?” The black and white population ONLY began to bond when an influx of Mexicans came for the many nursery/landscaping jobs in the area. Suddenly the hate, the spittings, the beatings, were all directed towards the illegal immigrants and Joe White was suddenly good enough to give a nod and “sup, homie.” I’m talking about a mostly low-middle class suburban town. Now I can walk down the street without being too worried about being jumped because it’s MLK day or what have you, but what of the new guys? And I KNOW that not all black Americans are this way. Not all are violent. But my eyes have seen things that are unseeable. I’ve been a victim of angry, hateful black men and literally had a learning disability beaten INTO me.

For me, I can say that the fears that whites have of blacks are warranted. Once I get to know you it’s a different story entirely– I’m not a blatant racist. But when I’m walking down a Philadelphia street alone and approaching Joe Black on the corner, I’m going to puff up like a damn blowfish and get to stepping like Carl Lewis. I know you’re talking about the police here and I’m just talking white/black relations in general, but white people have a side in this that isn’t just oppress, oppress, oppress. I can’t change what your father or his father went through, Will. We both can, though, raise our children to be kind and respectful to all colors. I really do believe that kind of life is on the horizon, or at least one close to it. There are still a lot of grandmas filling their grandchildren’s heads with bad ideas out there right now and I understand why, but time is going to be the ultimate healer in this, Will. We both know that change cannot be forced. Thanks for the reply, dude, and again, all “social” stuff aside I have a multitude of respect, love, and admiration for you.”

Duvall:Dustin, your story is deep and I appreciate you sharing it because it touches on some of the economic and human nature elements that lie at the heart of this entire conflict.

From what you’re describing, it sounds like you became the minority (or at least less of an overwhelming majority) in your neighborhood and, because of longstanding resentments felt by some of the black people there over what they’ve historically endured, you got scapegoated. That absolutely should not have happened. It was wrong. You were just a kid. You had no understanding of the insane dynamics at play in your neighborhood, let alone in the wider world. Any group of grown men who would gang up to attack a lone 14-year-old obviously have personal problems that go beyond the systemic issue I’m trying to address. Those people are just crazy. Cruelty comes in all colors and my guess is those guys would be bullies regardless of what they looked like and regardless of what was going on in the world. But I can assure you that you’re correct when you say that “not all black Americans are this way.” In fact, most certainly, the vast majority are not. Nevertheless, what happened to you was a shame. You say your story didn’t even warrant a mention in the police blotter. That’s yet a further shame, adding insult to injury. It was like it didn’t matter. It was like YOU didn’t matter.

Brother, all I can say is, I understand. Because that is how most black people in America feel every single day. That is the climate in which we’ve lived and raised our children for centuries, since the founding of this country when, by law, we were considered just 3/5 of a human being with no rights whatsoever, right up until today when I can watch a video of 12-year-old Tamir Rice get blown away by the cops right across the street from his home for playing with a toy gun. That boy wasn’t given the slightest chance. He was dead practically before the police car came to a stop. That’s not just a “crime.” That’s state-sponsored murder. And, for black people, this is nothing new. We have endured our children, particularly our men and boys, being demonized and summarily murdered by the state (or vigilantes protected by the state) for hundreds of years. And for most of that time, with untold thousands killed – shot, lynched, stabbed, burned alive, mutilated, dismembered – there was no news coverage. If it DID make the paper, the killers themselves might be seen in a photograph smiling around the mutilated body like it was a trophy. Either way, the victims were often faceless and nameless. Their true number will never be known. No matter what they were accused of doing, no matter what the circumstances, no matter what the evidence (or lack thereof), the explicit understanding was ALWAYS, “They had it coming.” And the killers – even if they admitted it, even if they bragged about it, even if they were photographed smiling over the body – walked away with no consequences. It was like it didn’t matter. It was like WE didn’t matter.”

Duvall:Now, we have video capturing entire incidences from start to finish and it STILL isn’t enough. In the last few weeks alone, in addition to Tamir Rice, we have John Crawford getting blown away in a Wal-Mart by Beavercreek, OH police. His offense? Talking to his girlfriend on his cellphone while holding a toy gun sold at the store. The video shows him getting shot from behind. He never even saw them coming. He never stood a chance. It was an ambush of a consumer in a store. The guy was a father of two children. His own father and his girlfriend had to listen to him die over the phone. They were forced to wait two weeks to even see the video. There were no charges, no indictment brought by the grand jury against the officers. Then we have Eric Garner getting wrestled to the ground and choked to death by six cops. He’s unarmed and not aggressive toward the officers in any way. Yet he’s put in a chokehold and taken down, gasping for his life. And then he’s dead. His offense? Allegedly selling loose cigarettes. He was a married father of six. Once again, there isn’t even an indictment brought. We’re not talking about Mississippi in 1914. We’re talking about New York City in 2014.

I will say, however, at least now some of these stories take center stage on the national news. That almost never used to happen. It’s an improvement I’ve witnessed first hand. But that comes with a price as well. Because, on TOP of not getting any indictment despite having everything on video, we also have to listen to a cavalcade of media pundits, activists, politicians, cops, ex-cops, medical examiners, and legal analysts interpret and DEBATE WHAT’S IN THE VIDEO. “He was resisting arrest/He wasn’t resisting arrest. It was a chokehold/No, it wasn’t a chokehold. He went for the gun/No, it was a summary execution. He was a hulking menace/No, he was a weakling. The police acted excessively/The police did nothing wrong (and even if they did you can’t blame them).

And then there is always the routine attempt by some to wage character assassination on the dead boy or man (or his family). Unless it can be proven that he was nothing but an angel-kissed choirboy every split-second of his life (as if any teenaged boy is), then he must have been a freakishly strong Super-Thug who made his killer “fear for his life” and therefore “He had it coming” like Trayvon Martin or Michael Brown. Can you understand, given the history and context behind these episodes, the endless replays of basically this same scenario over hundreds of years, why we might have more than a little difficulty believing an Officer Darren Wilson or a vigilante George Zimmerman, particularly when they both emerge from their supposedly death-defying struggle with these “demonic Super-Thugs” with barely a hint of a scratch or a bruise?

Cases like these don’t happen in a vacuum. They are supported by a long tradition of history and practice, not just in terms of police but the entire legal and penal system. This has been status quo for black people since our arrival on this continent. Can you understand how that might create simultaneous currents of hopelessness, fear, anger, and outrage?”

Duvall: But if we say or do anything in protest or opposition, we’re told by some people, “What the hell are you crying about?! There’s no problem here! Racism is over! YOU’VE GOT IT GOOD NOW!! How can you even say there’s still racism?! America just elected a black president! Twice!! Quit playing the race card! Quit being ‘divisive’! Hell, a lot of you have it better than me and I’m white! Quit preaching hate! YOU’RE JUST MAKING EVERYTHING WORSE!!

In reading your reply to me, I stand even more by my initial assessment that you’re a thoughtful guy. I really appreciate your candor about your reflexive fear of “Joe Black.” That’s more honesty than most people are willing to share. And, given what you say in your story, your fears seem understandable. My guess is the guys who attacked you were transferring some of their trauma, both personal AND systemic, onto you. It was completely wrong. But that’s what happens with trauma and violence. It begets more trauma and violence. My hope is that you can take your feelings of fear, anger, and resentment over the attacks you suffered, both physical and psychological – those “unseeable” things you saw, the feeling that you were being demonized, under constant suspicion no matter what you did (or didn’t do), the dread and looming danger of further abuse and bodily threat that could visit you any second (provoked or not), the overall feeling that you didn’t matter, and the stress of having to swallow those feelings every minute of every day just to survive and move forward with your life – and imagine how millions of black people have felt, generation after generation, for hundreds of years.

You also describe a lower middle class neighborhood with what sounds like increasingly scarce economic opportunity. That really gets to the root of ALL these problems. When people see the pie shrinking and find themselves fighting for crumbs, that creates a bedrock foundation for scapegoating. You said that the tension between the black and white people in your neighborhood only lessened when the Latinos moved in and suddenly there was a new scapegoat against whom you could both unite. That really sums up our species, doesn’t it? Terribly sad, but true. And, again, you can trace it back not only to the beginnings of this country but the beginnings of humanity itself. Just like violence and trauma, scapegoating begets more scapegoating. We’ve got over 500 years of documented history of that on this continent alone. Dehumanization of an entire group of people always has an economic agenda attached to it.

The first diary entries of Columbus’s sailors show complete fascination, even envy, toward the Indians. The sailors describe their awe not only at the native people’s physical beauty but also their entire civilization and their intuitive sense of harmony with one another and the earth. But when it came time to make the grab for gold, the beautiful, fascinating, intuitive Indians suddenly became “savages.” In the pursuit of wealth, it became okay to mutilate, rape, and murder.

A little over a hundred years later came the African slave trade. Despite the sophistication and grandeur of that continent’s many ancient kingdoms, including Egypt, which was the light of the world for several millennia and still captures the imagination of many today, the justification for the slavery of Africans, whose free labor literally built the American economy, was that all black people were savages. They were considered animals who wouldn’t even know what to do with themselves if they weren’t slaves. But going back even further, long before America, we know that slavery was commonplace in countries and empires all over the world. In fact, many of the slaves who were brought over to America were purchased by the Europeans from other Africans. They were often defeated captives of various tribal and territorial wars. And, if they survived the journey to America (which many didn’t), once they arrived the abuse was so severe that, even while hating their condition, many slaves themselves helped perpetuate it – assisting in the abuse of other slaves, helping chase down runaways, ratting out potential rebels, etc. They did this to survive. Some even justified the institution in their own minds. You describe having a learning disability “beaten into” you. Once again, in sharing your own experience, you articulate the condition of millions of black people. And, once again, scapegoating begets scapegoating.”

Duvall: “Even today, some black people will say and do things that, in the opinion of many other black people, contribute to and validate the demonization aimed at us by the larger society. To get back to the police issue, we’ve got black cops who will admit they are afraid of other black men. In the Eric Garner video, we see a black female officer standing in the background who was apparently the supervising sergeant. She’s just standing there watching this man get killed. That’s just one example of many equal or worse ones. It’s not just white officers acting out across color lines. And whenever the police are questioned or challenged about a particular action, particularly one involving them using lethal force, more often than not, we see that blue trumps black or white. It becomes officers on one side, citizens on the other. This despite the fact that there are black cops who say THEY’RE afraid of being criminally profiled (and possibly killed) by other cops when they’re out of uniform.

We have a serious problem. The victims’ families are not making this up. The thousands of people out there demonstrating in the streets all over this country are not making it up. All the athletes and artists voicing their support, including myself, aren’t making this up. When the Mayor of New York City gives a press conference on television with his family and says he’s afraid for his bi-racial son’s life with regard to the police, he’s not making it up.

As you can see (and have experienced yourself), these issues are incredibly complicated: Cruelty comes in all colors. Color is often secondary to Economics. Racism is merely one rationale to justify cruelty. But we’ve still got to deal with the fallout and ripple effects of both.

Like I said in my statement the other day, we’ve made some tremendous strides as a nation. In terms of race relations, this is a better America than the one in which my parents grew up. But that’s only because black AND white people all over this country stood up, admitted there was a problem, and forced the issue toward change. We fought a civil war over slavery. Then it was another 100 YEARS before I could so much as sit at the same lunch counter or drink from the same water fountain as you in the very city from which I write to you now. We’re talking about the 1960s. That’s within my lifetime!! And, even then, it took a complete social upheaval just to effect such basic changes. People – both black and white – had to get beaten, jailed, and KILLED just to make those simple things happen. And what were those people getting beaten, jailed, and killed being told back then? “What the hell are you crying about?! There’s no problem here! Slavery’s been over for a 100 years! WHY CAN’T YOU ALL JUST GET OVER IT?! YOU’VE GOT IT GOOD NOW! Hell, some of you have it better than me and I’m white! All your RACE-BAITING isn’t going to solve anything! You’re just making trouble! Quit preaching hatred! YOU’RE JUST MAKING THINGS WORSE!!”

See a pattern here?”

Duvall: “Some have tried to characterize what I’m saying as a diatribe against all police officers. It most certainly is not. I’ve had members of my family and good friends who have served on the police force. They have a tough job, one that I certainly would not want to do. I’ve had positive encounters with police all over this world. Nobody appreciates good policing more than me. Good cops are heroes. Some have tried to characterize what I’m saying as a diatribe against all white people or all white males. Just think about that for a second. Look at the band I’m in now. Look at every band I’ve been in over the course of more than 30 years playing music. Look at my audience. My own family is full of white, black, brown, and bi-racial people. My inner circle of closest friends splits right down the middle black and white. All I know is the rainbow and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

I don’t have any easy answers. I don’t think they exist. All I know is I want to leave this world a better place than I found it, like my parents and grandparents did for my generation. This is not about ME. As I’ve said many times, I’m doing better than most. This is about ALL of us – black, white, brown, Asian, Christian, Muslim, Jewish, male, female, LGBT, etc. Because we all suffer under a system that seems to value the lives of one group of people over another. And this is mostly about the children coming after us. I see a national conversation taking place about an historical injustice that resonates with my own life experience. I’ve been waiting, along with millions of other people, to have this conversation for a VERY long time. I believe we may have reached a point to finally effect some meaningful positive change. I spoke up because there was no way I could remain silent.

I know this was long but I just had to say it. I hope you’ll read it in the spirit with which it was intended.

I want to thank you again for this exchange. It’s been meaningful for me and I hope it has been for you as well. I wish you peace and continued personal recovery on your life’s journey.

Happy Holidays to you and yours.”

Billy Corgan had some choice words for the Foo Fighters and Pearl Jam today during a new interview on the Howard Stern show. Corgan first compared the work of Pearl Jam to both the Smashing Pumpkins and Nirvana:

“No. Not even close. I think they were derivative and the work speaks for itself. If you listen to the band’s work, and I know they have a tremendous fanbase and they should, they’re a great band but you know, I’m a Beatles guy, a Stones guy and a Kinks guy but if you go to a lot of those other bands they just don’t have the work. I just don’t think Pearl Jam have the songs. If you stack my songs up, Cobain’s songs up and that band’s songs up, they don’t have the songs. They’re a great band, still an arena act, they’ve been getting it done for a long time and I have to bow to that but it’s a mystery to me on how they have because I just don’t get it. They don’t have the songs. People will take that the wrong way but speaking competitively, they are my competitors and I have to say who am I competing against & why.”

Corgan also said the following when asked about potentially collaborating with Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder:

“I would have to understand his motivation, we were friends at one point so it’s not like there is a relationship train-track there. I haven’t been in a social frame with the guy in I don’t know how long but I think a lot of people are transformed by fame. I knew one person and then there was another person. I’m another person so maybe he felt the same way about me. You can’t blame the guy though, he was on the cover of TIME magazine, not me and dealt with a level of fame that I never dealt with.”

The Smashing Pumpkins frontman was also critical of Foo Fighters’ recent output, saying the band needs to “evolve”:

“I’m not particularly thrilled with the Foo Fighters. Dave is a great musician, a great songwriter and has done the work but to me, my criticism of the Foo Fighters, if I’m being a music critic is that they just haven’t evolved and that’s sort of the recent wrap on them is, you know, making the same music. Ovbiously, I’ve put my whole life on the line for making different types music as I’ve gone along. We’ve talked last time I was here about playing old songs, evolving and it’s just my mentality. I know it’s not for everybody. Listen, he’s getting it done so it’s like, if you want to be competitive, my philosophy against his, he’s the one winning.”

You can view the full interview below:

The season finale of South Park airs tomorrow, Wednesday, December 10th and is going to feature “appearances” from multiple entertainers.

The Washington Redskins’ Go F-uck Yourself Holiday Special boasts appearances from U2, Taylor Swift, Bill Cosby, Al Pacino as well as the holograms of Kurt Cobain, Elvis Presley and Michael Jackson. The special is a continuation of last week’s episode with spoofs of modern popular acts such as Miley Cyrus, Iggy Azalea and Lorde. You can view the trailer for the season finale below:

In other Kurt Cobain news, director Brett Morgen has released a statement regarding Courtney Love’s involvement in the HBO Kurt Cobain documentary Montage of Heck:

Courtney Love first came to me with the idea for Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck in 2007. She was hoping to make a film that revealed a deeper understanding of Kurt than had been depicted in the media. While several parties control rights to Kurt’s music, Courtney and her daughter, are the sole rights holders to Kurt’s belongings, which are used quite readily throughout the film. In granting me access to his possessions, Courtney gave me permission to use the items in any manner I deemed appropriate for the film. She never asked for any editorial involvement. In today’s age, and particularly when making a film on a public figure, it is virtually unheard of to grant this kind of access to a filmmaker. And for that I will always be grateful.

Any suggestion that Courtney was denied editorial involvement couldn’t be further from the truth. It was her idea to let me have control. This film would not exist today without the support of Courtney Love, Frances Bean Cobain and Wendy O’Connor.

The trust that has been invested in me by Courtney, Frances, and Kurt’s immediate family has been crucial in allowing me to paint a portrait of Kurt that is both honest, unflinching, empathetic, and effecting. I look forward to sharing this film with audiences around the world in 2015.”

In a new Q&A with Rolling Stone, Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl ripped critics of the Foo Fighters latest studio album Sonic Highways:

Look, that was one of the first conversations that we had when we started this project. I would explain the idea and someone would say, “Oh, cool. So, are you going to play a blues song? Are you going to make a country song in Nashville? Are you going to do jazz in New Orleans?” And I thought, “Can you fucking imagine how much of a train wreck that would be?” I said, “You have to remember that not everybody has HBO and is going to see the series.”

So, first and foremost, we have to make a Foo Fighters record. That’s it. And I really fought to retain that. At one point in Nashville, I walked in the control room and everyone was wearing fucking cowboy hats. I was like, “Guys! Don’t! Stop! Wait! We are still the Foo Fighters. Don’t forget that.” I think maybe people misunderstood the concept and thought that we were going to incorporate all of the different flavors or genres from each city, and, to me, it didn’t make any sense because the last thing I want to do is chase something that’s not real.

Grohl also said:

“You’re like, Hey, I’ve done this thing! Fuck, I can’t wait for people to hear this! I’m so proud of it. It was such a blast to do.” You get excited and then you realize that people didn’t really understand it in the first place. So you’re like, “Aw, fuck it.” It’s one of those things that after 20 years, nothing is going to keep us from doing what we do. And there’s not much to discourage us from the path that we’ve been on for this long. Look, if some dude with a blog says the band blew it because we didn’t fucking put a lap steel [guitar] on our song in Nashville, then that same day you sell out Wembley Stadium in a day, it’s like, “OK, well, I guess we’re doing something right.”

Soundgarden will be returning to Australia as part of the massive, upcoming Soundwave 2015 lineup and the band have announced today that they’ll be playing two additional Sidewave shows in addition. Those dates are as follows:

Soundgarden 2015 Sidewaves

Tickets on sale 9am Friday, 12th December 2014

Tuesday 24th February 2015
Festival Hall, Melbourne
Tickets: Ticketmaster

Thursday, 26th February 2015
Big Top Luna Park, Sydney
Tickets: Oztix / eventopia/ Big Top Sydney

In other Soundgarden news, the band posted the following on Facebook recently regarding their documentary:

It’s happening – the Soundgarden story will soon be the subject of a feature documentary film. And you can help. As we dig deep into our vaults, we ask that you, the fans, dig into yours.

Personal photographs, bootleg video and audio, collected concert posters – your rare piece of music history could be the missing piece we need.

If you want a chance for your memento to become a permanent part of Soundgarden history, send a description of what you’ve got to info@bangerfilms.com with the subject “Soundgarden Fan Submission”.

The Soundgarden film is being produced by Banger Films, makers of the essential heavy metal documentary Metal: A Headbanger’s Journey (2006), SXSW Audience Award and Juno-winning Iron Maiden: Flight 666 (2009), Grammy-nominated and Tribeca Audience Award-winning Rush: Beyond The Lighted Stage (2010), the “doc opera” Super Duper Alice Cooper (2014), as well as the biggest-ever TV series on metal and hard rock, Metal Evolution (2011).

Kim Thayil told AlternativeNation.net about the documentary earlier this year, “I haven’t seen any footage yet, but we have a general idea, an outline. We imagine it’ll be chronological, and maybe a bit autobiographical (chuckles). I don’t know, I haven’t seen anything yet, but I imagine it’ll be very good. The guys who I understand are working on it are fantastic, they make some great documentaries.”

Billy Corgan has had almost thirty years of music experiences, and as a result has gained a lot of interaction with David Bowie.

He described some of his favorite David Bowie stories in a new interview with WXRT, his first time conscientiously listening to Bowie as “an alien sense of listening to something and thinking ‘wow what is this music?'” and describes how progressive and influential David Bowie was.

Plus he describes Bowie influencing Smashing Pumpkins, as Corgan says “‘Why would we repeat ourselves (from) album to album if The Beatles didn’t do it and the Beatles didn’t do it. Certainly we couldn’t do it.”

While Corgan was unable to remember the first time he saw David Bowie live, he claimed the most memorable time was when he performed with David Bowie at Madison Square Garden for Bowie’s 50th birthday. Corgan remembered David Bowie blew him out of the water during the performance of All the Young Dudes. He also described that experience as “mind-blowing”.

Corgan also described David Bowie as the greatest voice in alternative music, and described the last three or four records as some of Bowie’s best work.

As a person, Corgan described David Bowie as a “wonderful person through and through. He’s always been so kind to me.”

You can view our review of the newest Smashing Pumpkins album,  Monuments to an Elegy below

First off, we know not to call it a comeback, and Billy’s been here for years, but the question is: did he knock them out like Mama told him to?

Billy Corgan has been hyping up Smashing Pumpkins’ new album Monuments to an Elegy ever since the ambitious project (which also includes its followup Day For Night) was announced earlier this year. BillCo even told AlternativeNation.net in September, “I feel like it’s there, and all of the response that I’ve gotten behind the scenes is off the charts. Just a really, really intense response. Things like people saying, ‘This is the record I’ve been waiting for you to make for 15 years.’ That kind of stuff, very grandiose things, but it tells me that we’re on point, in terms of hitting the right note. Because if you made like, ‘Hahaha, Siamese Dream 2,’ people wouldn’t have that response. They wouldn’t see it as current, and I know that from my own list, so it feels current to people that are hearing it.”  You can stream the full album on iTunes by clicking here.

Opener “Tiberius” sets the tone for the unpredictable album. There is a sense of familiarity with the riff, which does harken back a bit to 90’s Pumpkins, but the piano parts and Corgan’s ‘ghosts and gods’ refrain keep the song sounding fresh. The production is noticeably solid on this track, which helps alleviate any fears of missteps like Zeitgeist.

“Being Beige” is the album’s lead single, and when it first came out I was caught a bit off guard, as with Corgan’s hype I was expecting a big rocker, but the track has grown into being one of my favorite rock songs of 2014. Corgan’s lyrics of heartbreak still have a sense of sincerity that many of his contemporaries have lost in the later years of their career. Corgan sings: ‘I don’t love you/for what it’s worth/so if you’re leaving could you hurt.’ Even as he pushes 50, Corgan still sounds lost and yearning for love, which always makes for great music. The song has two great hooks, with the standout being: ‘The world’s on fire/have you heard?’ “Being Beige” features one of Corgan’s best vocal performances in recent years.

“Anaise!” is probably the oddest song on the album, opening with a bass riff mixed with synth. There are some good vocals during the chorus, but this song isn’t as immediate as the first two. A new part comes 2 minutes in that helps elevate the song, and it gives it some potential as a grower.

When “One and All” first was released I thought it was a little Pumpkins by numbers, but after “Anaise” it makes sense to go back to basics. The song has a classic Grunge rock riff, and is a nice midlevel album cut, but there are more memorable songs on the album.

“Run2Me” is the best song Billy Corgan has written since “Tarantula,” maybe even Zwan. The track is driven by synth, with some shades of New Order and Bruce Springsteen (and even The Killers). “Run2Me” has an incredibly catchy hook, ‘Run to me/my love is strange,’ it easily sounds like something that could easily be a huge radio hit. Corgan covers new sonic ground here and doesn’t sound like he’s reaching for the past, but reaching for new melodic highs. Tommy Lee gives one of his best performances here, giving a real edge to what is at its core a beautiful pop song.

“Drum + Fife” is another song with a catchy chorus, there is a real emphasis on this album of cutting through the bullshit and having a strong hook, and getting there as quick as possible. There are some corny aspects of the song like the line ‘I will bang this drum until my dying day’ but the tight arrangement and chorus makes it memorable.

“Monuments” sounds very contemporary, like something that could be played at a club while kids my age do ecstasy. When it comes to experimentation, this track worse much better than “Anaise!.” There are still classic Corgan melodic parts thrown in despite the club vibe of the song.

“Dorian” sounds a bit like Adore. It’s a nice track with some interesting sonic textures, but it gets a little repetitive.

“Anti-Hero” has been hyped as having a ‘Grunge’ riff, but it has more shades of pop punk. It’s one of the catchiest songs on the album, and sounds like something somebody in their 20’s today might write, in a good way.

Overall, this album proves that Billy Corgan has something left to give the world of rock. He sounds focused here on writing the best songs he can, with the biggest hooks possible. This isn’t Siamese Dream or Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, it’s The Smashing Pumpkins in 2014.  Monuments to an Elegy is Corgan’s tightest album since Zwan’s Mary Star of the Sea, and while 2012’s Oceania was a solid album, this one packs more of a punch and has catchier songs.

Rating: ****

pumpkinstar

Best songs: Run2Me, Being Beige, Tiberius, Anti-Hero, and Monuments

The Scott Stapp drama continues as the Creed frontman skipped a court hearing in Florida yesterday according to Gossipextra. The hearing was to determine whether Stapp needed to be held against his will and put in a psychiatric hospital for mental evaluation and drug treatment. A sheriff’s deputy was sent to the local Holiday Inn Stapp is reportedly living in with a summons, however did not show up and because the summons is a civil matter, Stapp is not being actively pursued by the police.

If Stapp misses court once again he risks being held of contempt of court. You can view the summons below:

scott_stapp_summons

 

Creed members Brian Marshall and Mark Tremonti have reached out to their on again, off again lead singer Scott Stapp, according to recent Facebook posts.

Bassist Brian Marshall posted on November 29th, “I just wanted everyone to know that I’ve reached out to Scott Stapp. We talked briefly yesterday and he seems to be okay… I let him know that we were all worried and if he needed a sober friend to talk to that I’m always available..”

He followed this up with another message yesterday, “Due to the exposure my post has received, I feel I need to clarify what I meant by saying Scott Stapp “seems to be okay”. It is obvious Scott is not “ok” and that he needs medical help and/or an intervention if he does not surrender to this disease before he hurts himself or others. I was trying to inform those who were concerned about his immediate well being, that we were reaching out to him during this difficult time and will continue to do so until the family gets the help they need.”

Guitarist Mark Tremonti posted a message on November 27th, “I know everyone is very worried about Scott, I am as well. I tried reaching out but didn’t have any success. I will keep trying but I think it would be best to keep such personal matters off social media.”

On a recent Sonic Highways episode, Barrett Jones revealed an unheard Dave Grohl demo entitled Hooker on the Street during the documentary’s Seattle episode. However, we noticed something else during that scene. When Jones is showing Grohl a bunch of his old, solo demos, one track forces the Foo Fighters frontman to hide his face and has Grohl screaming in a silly voice, “You watered it down, down/ you watered it down/ water water water water water water water.” When Jones doesn’t have the said vocals isolated it’s clear that the track is actually from the Allister Lobb sessions.

Hardcore Foo Fighters fans have most likely heard the name Allister Lobb, which was used by Dave Grohl, his sister Lisa and Mike “Mikey Dees” Nelson when they recorded a 5 track instrumental demo with Barrett Jones in the early 90s.

You can listen to “Watered It Down” above.

In other recent Dave Grohl news, the Foo Fighters frontman revealed in a new interview with Rolling Stone that he already knows what the concept will be for the next Foo Fighters album, and that he even knows when it will likely come out.

“I don’t think anyone’s ever done it,” he said. “And it’s fucking cool. It will blow everybody’s mind. Nobody has the balls to do it. And that’s three years away.”

Grohl’s time frame means the album will likely come out in late 2017, possibly early 2018. Grohl has already mentioned in a few interviews that he has an innovative concept for the next Foo Fighters album. For the band’s last two records, they have recorded the albums in unique ways and used them as key components of the marketing campaigns for both albums. 2011’s Wasting Light was recorded in Dave Grohl’s garage on tape, with pieces of the tape even being places in copies of the album. The band’s latest album Sonic Highways was recorded in 8 cities.

Jeff Schaffer, executive producer of the hit HBO show Curb Your Enthusiasm, sat down for an exclusive interview with AlternativeNation.net recently, and during the interview we were able to get an exclusive piece for our TV & Film section. Schaffer discussed the status of Curb and whether or not the show will return for final season.

“Larry and I talk about it, Larry’s about to do a play on Broadway that will open this Spring. He’s going to do that for the Spring into the Summer. After he’s done with that, we’ll do something, I’m not sure if it will be Curb, it might be something else. There’s definitely a chance.”

Foo Fighters recently performed a secret show at Irving Plaza in New York, New York. Below is the setlist, and some video from the show.

Setlist:
Outside
The Pretender
Learn to Fly
White Limo
Arlandria
Rope
My Hero (w/ short drum solo)
Hey, Johnny Park!
Monkey Wrench
Congregation
Walk
Cold Day in the Sun
I’ll Stick Around (Preceded by “In the Clear” false start)
In the Clear
Big Me
Something From Nothing
Times Like These
These Days
Miss You (The Rolling Stones cover)
Breakdown (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers cover)
Under Pressure (Queen & David Bowie cover)
All My Life
This Is a Call
I Am a River (Live debut)
Best of You
Everlong



In a recent interview with Howard Stern, Dave Grohl revealed that his favorite Foo Fighters song is “Times Like These”. Taylor Hawkins also shared his memories of the song.

Grohl said, “I mean honestly, that song, I like really simple songs, that have simple hooks, and simple melodies. [Times Like These] is kind of the one.”

Hawkins added, “We did that a demo of that in my basement for the first time. That’s a poignant song, because it’s about the band starting over again.”

Grohl then said, “We almost stopped playing in 2001. It was like a 7 year itch thing, where I went off and played with Queens of the Stone Age, we were recording and it wasn’t turning out well, so we were like, maybe we shouldn’t do this any more.”

In the same interview, Dave Grohl revealed that he almost recorded with David Bowie.

“We were going to maybe do a thing together, and it really didn’t pan out.”

“I had the opportunity to do a song thing for this movie. I thought, I don’t really want this to be just me, it would be really fun to get someone else to sing on it. I had worked with his producer Tony Visconti, and I asked Tony, ‘Do you think David would be interested in doing something?’”

He added that he became e-mail buddies with Bowie, “He’s wickedly funny.” He said logistics is the reason the collaboration didn’t happen, “The logistics just didn’t work out, one of those things. They don’t always work out, sometimes you want to do something, and there’s no time.”

Grohl was interviewed on Marc Maron’s podcast last year and praised David Bowie’s comeback single “Where Are We Now?” Grohl said, “The song is about Berlin and it’s heartbreaking dude.” He added, “I was playing it and our drummer Taylor said ‘Dude is he gonna die?’ It’s fucking the most beautiful thing you’ve heard in your entire life.” He ended the discussion by saying to the host, “You’ve got to hear it, it’s mind blowing.”

Grohl also discussed his newfound appreciation of disco. He said he didn’t listen to it much when he was younger and discussed the disco backlash, but said that he enjoys today, “I listen to disco now, and I’m like, well wait, what’s wrong with disco? I put it on in the morning when I make breakfast and the kids dance. Those drummers were amazing, those disco drummers were fucking amazing.” He added, “Disco’s great! What’s wrong with disco?”