Slash’s Bandmate Says Guns N’ Roses Classics Belong To Axl Rose

23
19260

Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators bassist Todd Kerns discussed singing Guns N’ Roses songs in a new interview with Rock Today.

“It’s really interesting that you say that because at first it was just sort of like Slash had that solo album out and he had Iggy Pop and Lemmy, God rest his soul, and there’s a few songs that weren’t really in Myles’ sort of wheelhouse. So it was sort of like “why don’t you sing it?” kind of thing, and I was like ‘Ok!’. Initially, I don’t know whether it was all that welcome of a break from the steady flow of what was happening during the show (laughs) and I’m sure a lot people were like ‘who the hell is this guy and where did Myles go?’ but over time it became kind of a thing and people came to really identify Doctor Alibi with myself as much as Lemmy in a funny way, although it will always be Lemmy’s work. It became our own version of the song and became its own thing. It’s surreal to look back on it now because I don’t remember questioning it in any fashion because I’m such a musician who when someone says something like ‘Let’s try this, let’s try that’ I’m usually the one that goes ‘Let’s do it!’. I don’t really think of the repercussions.

It’s just like diving into a cold pool without thinking what’s underneath the water? Is this contaminated? Is this 3 feet deep? Am I going to break my head? It became a lot more serious when Slash said ‘why don’t you sing Welcome To The Jungle’. That’s when I said of course, I know that song. I’ve been singing it in bands since I was a kid. It wasn’t until later that I thought to myself ‘Jeez! That’s like singing the national anthem or something’. There’s some seriousness behind certain songs. Sweet Child O’Mine, Welcome To The Jungle – they really belong to another person entirely really, Axl Rose essentially. To me it’s you do your tribute to it, you do your thing, you put your spin on it and that’s kind of that.”