Rumored Cause Of Death For Cranberries’ Dolores O’Riordan

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Yahoo and A Journal Of Musical Things are reporting a rumor that Dolores O’Riordan, the late lead singer of The Cranberries, died of fentanyl poisoning on Monday, a source in the London Police Department said according to the Santa Monica Observer.

Authorities found counterfeit fentanyl near the 46-year-old’s rocker’s bed, a source told the Santa Monica Observer. The source added that no official cause of death has been declared yet, saying that an official cause of death will be announced later with the toxicology report.

Police ruled O’Riordan’s death non-suspicious, meaning they found no evidence of foul play.

Note that larger sources are not reporting this, so it should be taken with a grain of salt as it seems largely based around The Santa Monica Observer (which isn’t a well known outlet), but Yahoo also posted a story about it.

The London coroner’s office has announced that late Cranberries singer Dolores O’Riordan’s cause of death will not be known until at least April.

The coroner’s officer Stephen Earl provided more details about the circumstances of O’Riordan’s death on January 15th at the age of 46.

“The London ambulance service was contacted and verified her death at the scene,” Earl told The Guardian; O’Riordan was found unresponsive in her London hotel room Monday. “Subsequently, the Met police attended and they determined the death to be non-suspicious.” Earl added that a postmortem exam had been carried out and that the coroners’ office was waiting on the results.

A rep for the Westminster Coroners’ Court told Rolling Stone that an April 3rd hearing has been scheduled to determine when to release their findings regarding O’Riordan’s death.

  • makingconnections

    Please be careful of any drug you purchase people…there are deaths in the area where I live constantly, and they aren’t street people dying necessarily. Recently a well-known teacher of yoga and meditation was shockingly lost. It’s said that he’d been cut off his regular small dose of pain medication because there are new strict laws on prescribing that are forcing some people who can’t cope to buy off the street. It’s very dangerous out there to purchase any sort of drug that way. Fentanyl shows up in everything. Apparently the long-time addicts are not being affected so much as those who only use drugs now and then…weekend parties, that sort of thing and of course those whose doctors are too frightened of the authorities to prescribe what they always have.

    • Elizabeth

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    • Kay B

      Wise words. We have been getting many young adults overdosing on such drugs and I live in a small town outside of Madison.WI. The friends roll up in the car, push the overdosed “friend” out of the car for people in the ER to find. Then we have to track down these so called friends and charge them. Be careful out there. I have never done drugs because my jobs have always drug tested but I have a younger brother who did. He is a big wig chemist now go figure. But when he was doing very potent shit I had to kick his ass back into reality. (Seriously I kicked his ass in a snow storm). Look out for one another.

      • makingconnections

        I really can’t stand hearing the politicians use ‘the opioid crisis” in their talking points, as if they give a shit and as if they could solve the problem to any degree. For once, I wish they’d turn to experts, take a look at what has worked in other countries (if it ever has). I don’t have the answers but I heard a speaker say recently that if we’re at war with drugs, it’s time to make peace. He was all for legalization. I know the safe injection sites in Vancouver are really helping, but they’re for hard-core addicts. At least they are now able to live some sort of life though. I really don’t have any answers at all, except that more people have to care.
        Good for you sorting your brother out. The path that a person’s life takes is so interesting and I’m glad he didn’t get into big trouble. Personally, I think teaching our very young children how to cope with their emotions, even how to meditate and techniques to calm themselves down might help them as teens to not so much want to alter their states. I always babble even more when I talk to you Kay!

        • Kay B

          No they don’t care. Why would they? But this “war” on drugs has gone on forever. Maybe putting the addicts on an island to do whatever they want is the answer then they can’t hurt anyone else. I know thats a horrible solution but what can you do?

          • makingconnections

            There’s not an island big enough Kay. Vancouver is a port city from the Asian countries and it’s believed that’s where the toxic fentanyl comes from, besides the other really bad stuff. Therefore Vancouver has a whole community of addicts on the East Side that have been there for generations. It used to be the place that fishermen and loggers went to get high with their pay cheques…a down and dirty place but not like it is now. That’s why the Safe Injection Sites were so necessary. Kids go down their for a weekend and are never seen again….There’s a really good documentary that two RCMP officers who worked the streets there made a few years ago…an eye opener…I’ll try to find the name of it.

          • Kay B

            I have been to Vancouver a while ago. It was a beautiful city. I could see how it would have the problems being a port city. I hear Portland, OR is pretty bad with drugs and runaways. But even where I work which is a very small town, we get drug patients and it is growing.

          • makingconnections

            The documentary by NFB, is called “Through a Blue Lens”. It was made with the help of the addicts in an effort to show people the awful life of an addict and it is definitely a look at the dark side. Actually, I think it’s very generous of the them to expose themselves the way they did. You can watch it on line.

          • Kay B

            I have been watching “Intervention” for years. It is decent. I can’t believe the enablers the parents and family become. If my kid was doing meth and came up to me and asked for 50$ I wouldn’t give it to them. And they let their kids do meth in their own home. They aren’t the cure they are pert of the disease. I grew up in a pretty strict household though.

          • makingconnections

            I have only watched a bit of Intervention. It’s upsetting….and yes stupid most of the time. “Through a blue lens” is different in that it’s cops talking with real down and out addicts who are trying to convince others that it’s a bad, bad life. It’s a powerful film that I’ll never watch twice, but I’ve never forgotten it.

          • Kay B

            I will check it out.

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      • Olga Stewart

        Pushing their friend out of the car?

        How horrible that is.

      • Olga Stewart

        And how is your brother doing now?

        • Kay B

          He is great. He is the lead chemist of the Target company. He does very well for himself and his family.

          • Olga Stewart

            I’m very happy to hear that. :).

    • Kay B

      Actually I am reminded of a story. I’m very sure this happens all over. Years ago I used to work with this nurse and he was always sweating and always seemed to not know how to do his job. He would make some really stupid mistakes. Well one night I go into PACU where patients recover from surgery. There were no patients in there at the time. I flipped on the light and here was this nurse with an instrument we use in laparoscopic cases so it was a long, narrow instrument that grasped when you closed the handle. Well he was putting this into the sharps container and grabbing liquid narcotics left over in vials. And then he was shooting himself up. He of course was fired and later we had sharps containers that once they were closed they could not be opened again. Doctors were told to take left over drugs and draw them up in a syringe and squirt it out to also prevent abuse. However that rule I see broken all the time.

      • makingconnections

        Good God Kay–you must see so much, despite caring for people!

        • Kay B

          We had a doctor on Christmas day take his life at a near by hospital. He was battling depression and just broke up with his girlfriend and had a custody battle going with his ex wife. He was getting drugs out of a machine and a worker came in the room and he pointed a loaded gun at him and told him to walk away. He then doped himself up enough to take his life. Only 43 yo. Depression is such a wicked game and it is not taken as seriously as it should be.

          • makingconnections

            It makes you wonder how many suicides involve intense quarrels with partners. I think sometimes things are going badly, the person feels inadequate and then the drama becomes so huge that they want to punish their partner forever…..especially men, who sometimes haven’t been taught how to deal with their emotions and when they explode they are dangerous to themselves or others.

          • makingconnections

            That is so sad Kay….and he too left children behind. It makes you wonder how much depression is actually afflicting people. Sometimes I think we’re all mentally ill in one way or another, it’s just degrees….but that’s just a thought tonight. I always say: I’m feeling discouraged, I’m full of grief, and when my husband really pisses me off….well I once walked 3 miles in a very short period of time on pure adrenalin. We’d gone out for dinner to this neighbourhood pub and he left me sitting while he spoke with a bunch of guys playing darts…he kept waving at me and smiling….the meals came..he was still waving and smiling. He looked for me everywhere…finally found me almost home. A young woman who witnessed him trying to get me to ride with him in the truck saw me the next day and said: “Oh that was so cute…seeing you and …….arguing just like me and my boyfriend do, at your age!!!!”

        • Kay B

          You know you tend to get numb by it. You do your job and you go onto the next thing. I remember one of my first organ transplants we were doing bone and tissue harvesting. The victim was a 21 yo male who took some cocaine and got in a fight with his gf and opened a car door at 70 mph and jumped out. I was really struck by his age since it was my age at the time. I remember moving him over to the cold metal slab they use for corpses and I was like wait….let me get his head! And let me get him a blanket….I was acting like he was still alive because I felt so bad for him.

          • makingconnections

            I can’t imagine what it’s like to look death in the eye on a constant basis. I’m glad you get numb to it or it would be so hard I would think. After my father died I became a little comfortable with the death and dying process and helped a few people through their illness and death. I lived on a small island at the time. I always found the anticipation of going to their house was the worst time…once I was with them, it all seemed like natural life somehow. Soon everyone was saying: …….is so good with death and calling me all the time. I wasn’t particularly good at anything, just willing to step through the door. I think in our culture we are so afraid of seeing the suffering and the reality of illness and all that you see Kay to make people well.
            I heard a guy on the radio on the weekend talking about being a retired cop in Edmonton I believe, who drives organs to the airport or hospitals for transplants. He considered his work a privilege…a sacred work somehow. I thought that was beautiful as is your work.

          • Kay B

            What really helps is after every donation surgery we do the whole team gets a thank you letter from the donor network and it tells you who the organs went to. Not by name but for example the right kidney went to a father in his 40s who has 3 young children. And it explains where the organs went and who you helped. It is always great to hear.

          • makingconnections

            Bless you Kay.

  • Corndog

    Seriously reconsidering my weekend recreational choices….

  • Olga Stewart

    This fentanyl is some pretty bad business.

    So how many deaths will it take before someone finally wakes up and does something about it?

    • makingconnections

      Maybe it will take a high-ranking politician losing their eldest daughter who’s away at University. Sadly, it’s not until it hit’s their family before they understand what’s happening. We’re so “top-down” in our culture; the voices of ordinary people don’t count for much.

      • Kay B

        A whole nother ball of wax…..I believe it may take a politicians child to get killed in a mass shooting as well before the US does something about bump stocks and semi-autos. Even that is iffy.

      • Olga Stewart

        It just astounds me about the lack of care (perhaps apathy) towards an issue such as both this and shootings.

        Losing people in these ways is not right. And if we are ever going to try to make this world both better and safer for everyone, we need to open our eyes, get off of our butts, and do something about it.

        Just not doing anything will not help anything. In fact, it will just get worse.

        Ah but I sometimes despair of the human race. And I’m one of them.

        • makingconnections

          I have a friend who was a politician and he told me it’s such a difficult job–trying to make money go to healthcare, education and on and on. He was always so honest and would say he didn’t have the answers if he didn’t, that he was still learning about ‘whatever’. It’s very rare for a politician to say they don’t know about an issue. I don’t expect them to know about the fentanyl crisis, but at least they could be informing themselves and talking with the recovery people. I can’t imagine them doing such a thing. I have a hard time not despairing as well Olga. Apparently the situation down south has caused depression amongst it’s citizens….serious depression. We’ve come to this/

  • MedicTim

    You still have to injest “it”. Smoked, snorted, swallowed or banged; is irrelevant.
    NHL players, musicians, lawyers to homeless or housewives to ten year olds; it has no discrimination..
    Addiction prays on anyone, especially depressed and bipolar folk.
    I don’t know how to get it out there, the risks.
    I am a recovering heroin addict. I have 3 plus years with out. It was a ten year run.
    Tell your kids starting young is all You can do. Be hard on them if caught, easy didn’t do it here.
    Stay safe and if you dabble w opiates; good luck.
    *BTW as a medic I knew the consequences; now retired I am grateful as can be.

    • makingconnections

      I don’t have any proven solutions; however, being a mother and so interested in the lives of children, I think we should be focusing on raising healthy children…healthy physically and emotionally. Teaching them how to rest and sleep well,encouraging interest in the arts and sports and participating in their society in a helping way at a young age too. It’s amazing how responsive children are to techniques like meditation…..and music! Chris Cornell spoke of his mother buying him a set of drums and how it helped him as a troubled young person…he had something to bang on!
      Another really important aspect of mental illness and addiction is giving huge support to families in crisis in our communities…too many people “fall through the cracks”.
      P.S. Yours is a very inspiring story. Please stay well!

      • MedicTim

        Thank you.
        Chris Cornell, Layne, the list from Seattle is long and sad.
        Thank you.
        I agree, it has to start younger every year. We smoked pot at 14; Iit was 1978.
        Today they are having sex and banging H at 10.
        So things have changed. My boys 21 and 16 are aware of what I’ve been through and won’t go down the same road. I pray.
        Thank you again and I am looking into how to speak in Jr.Highs.
        Jails and rehabs will take speakers easy but parents MUST talk w kids under ten.
        My humble opinion.
        Bless you and yours.

        Tim

        • makingconnections

          I hope the speaking efforts go well. I have quite a lot of hope for children because I’ve taught them art and I truly believe we’re evolving…they are not as competitive as they were even 10 years ago, they tend to enjoy each others work rather. That amazes me; however, there’s this thing about human beings and I think it’s been part of how we have been for a long time. We like to alter our consciousness. I didn’t do much of anything when I was young. I lucked out in the oddest way in that I liked tough guys and tough boyfriends in my scene luckily didn’t like their girlfriends indulging in anything. They always had my back! Really, I think it was the time and the place but I developed this sense of myself as worth protecting (valid or not, who knows! haha!) Regardless I made it through what I consider to be the most dangerous time those teen-aged years.
          There’s obviously some sort of reaching out waiting for you, once again, best wishes for your work and life.

        • makingconnections

          Tim, something I’ve always thought might be helpful for the stage when kids are really vulnerable…around 11 and 12 these days ( I see the way they carry themselves change and they look scared sometimes)…that is a “talking circle” sort of thing where various people come and talk to a group who are connected in some way, and they talk with each other. I really feel that strong support and being listened to at that stage might help.

    • Olga Stewart

      I am very proud of you for getting help.

      I hope that wasn’t too mushy of a thing to say.

  • wpjokari

    Prince also had fentanyl in his system: it dropped him dead in his elevator.