AC/DC Offered Metal Icon New Singer Job

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It may come to the surprise of many that the inclusion of a new vocalist for AC/DC was not an easy task and it took many suggestions before finally finding the right replacement for Bon Scott. AC/DC looked in just about every direction to find the proper filling. From regular bands to bands who AC/DC had toured with, it was a very rough experience to reclaim the momentum and voice for the band.

Enter Marc Storace of Krokus who opened for AC/DC in the 1980s. Marc was so enthused to be a part of the spark of AC/DC and the band was very fond of him and his band as well. Looking back at it, Marc may have gone even further should he have taken the AC/DC job, but Marc had a very ‘stick to your guns’ attitude which led him and his band to their success and in admirable fashion.

Marc was featured in a new interview with Linea Rock and he was asked if he ever wonders what could have been having gone with the AC/DC job. While Storace gladly thought about life with that band, he was very happy to exclaim how far he came on his own.

Marc Storace stated: “That’s a hypothetical question. It’s all open to fantasy and dreams, but reality can take a different direction. And at that moment, I thought, ‘Well, I’m sitting on my high horse, enjoying success with KROKUS.’ My debut album [with KROKUS], ‘Metal Rendez-Vous’, went like a rocket. We did ‘Hardware’and we had, actually, a brand new light show, which arrived from Birmingham. And the CEO of that company in Birmingham — the whole hard rock scene, the center was Birmingham; LED ZEPPELIN and everyone else, and AC/DC, they were all doing their production stuff there.”

This is where Marc knew things were about to change for him. All the hard work that he had put in was finally getting noticed. As Marc continues: “And the guy took me to the side, the CEO because he drove down to show us this new light show computer, which we’d never seen one like that [before]. And then he took me on the side and he said, ‘Would you like to audition for AC/DC?’ And I said, ‘Steve, I’m so happy here. Things are happening, and we’re gonna go places. And these are my new mates.’ I had a kind of loyalty. I was thankful that I joined KROKUS because it suddenly happened.”

Marc felt an alliance with his band and he need not go elsewhere to fulfill his dreams because all he wanted was to live his own rather than someone else’s as he stated: “And I had been trying in many different ways. And even with [Swiss progressive rockers] TEA, though we had enjoyed an amount of success, it was nothing like what we achieved later on with KROKUS. So, looking back at this little guy in Malta, where there’s no record companies, no big rock and roll life, and no tours the way I dreamed of and everything, and looking at Switzerland, where it’s more known for the banks and the chocolates and the watches than hard rock bands, and seeing how far that KROKUS got to, I think we should be thankful. And that’s the way I feel; I feel thankful for what I’ve achieved with these guys.”