Blink-182’s Mark Hoppus Disagrees With Tom DeLonge About Aliens

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Blink-182 vocalist/bassist Mark Hoppus was recently interviewed by Vice. When asked what conspiracy theories he believes in, Hoppus said he didn’t believe in any, specifically in the idea that aliens have visited earth.

“I don’t. I know that I’m being lied to about stuff but I’m not too bothered by it. When I’ve been presented with stuff that people say is conspiracy I don’t take it at face value. I need more significant evidence. I don’t think that the moon landing was faked, I don’t believe in Big Foot or the Loch Ness Monster. I don’t think that aliens have visited us – I believe there’s life out there of some sort but I don’t think they’ve come here and hung out.”

The view is the opposite of Tom DeLonge, who told Paper Magazine last year that he believes humans have made contact with aliens.

“I think we already have. Whether or not that will be published or not, I have no idea. I think absolutely it’s been happening forever. It’s been happening with individuals all over the world, it’s been happening with governments to some degree. I don’t think we’re working underground with aliens.”

He added, “I think what’s gonna happen, mark my words, is that they’re going to find the microbial life that’s they’ve been talking about on Mars and then, it’s one planet over. We’re gonna send people up there, and we’re gonna find remnants of other types of life. But really, what’s going to be there are remnants of other civilizations: architecture, old monuments, machinery, things that have been fossilized, whatever, and then that will get dripped out for another 30 to 40 years. Maybe there was a civilization there.”

He also discussed an encounter he believes he had with aliens last year while camping at Area 51, “We had two nights. We did one outside of a secret base called China Lake. And that was on the flight path to Area 51, which is known as Groom Lake. We camped out at the northern end of that, about 200 miles from the nearest staff location. We were above an area called Tonopah, which is where they test-fly a lot of different things. So if you remember, I was talking about a person that was gathering all that footage for the congressional hearing. That person was telling me that the big belief, which I had corroborated by a university professor that was in the know, by the way, that the communication of this particular phenomenon is the frequency of thought. So part of communicating and making contact is shutting your mind down and being able to project your thoughts. And this guy was telling me about it, and this whole protocol for how it works.

When we went out there the first night, we decided to run through this protocol where you project your thoughts. So we decided to do it, and we were up mad late, but nothing happened. I kept telling the guys: if anything was going to happen, it would happen at three in morning, because that’s the time when things like this happen. Don’t ask me why. We put about four logs on the fire, and everything is illuminated by the fire, and we fall asleep around one or two. I woke up right around three a.m. My whole body felt like it had static electricity, and I open my eyes and the fire is still going, and there’s a conversation going on outside the tent. It sounded like there were about 20 people there, talking. And instantly my mind goes, OK, they’re at our campsite, they’re not here to hurt us, they’re talking about shit, but I can’t make out what they’re saying. But they’re working on something. Then I close my eyes and wake up, and the fire is out and I have about three hours of lost time.”