Eddie Vedder Emotionally Talks Struggles With Depression, How To Reach Out For Help

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Eddie Vedder emotionally discussed how to deal with distress and mental health issues at a show last week in Amsterdam, and why people should reach out for help, especially based on his own experiences.

“I asked Glen [Hansard] if I could even do, sing his song, and I’ve, uh…I just….(hands over face) God, I…I just want people to know if you ever, it’s…(struggling to get the words out), I’ve been through it so I know there are times when it feels like there’s, there’s no one around and I know that seems…crazy, because, uh, I’ve been very fortunate and even when I was young, I, I…that was the roughest…time. I don’t know if I had anyone when I was an adolescent, for a while there. Um, I probably did, though. I just didn’t know it, and I didn’t reach out and then as I got older maybe there was a couple of times I didn’t reach out, uh, because I felt like that would be a sign of weakness or, um (trails off)…you know I…but, but it actually empowers other people.

They, they, like to help. It gives them, um, they’ll drop everything, you know there’s, there’s people out there and sometimes there may be strangers on the other end of a phone line that, that dedicate their lives to helping people in distress. I, I’m not saying anything about anybody in particular, please allow me to talk about it without……making it seem obvious, but it just, uh, it’s just..I can’t stop..(voice shakes) thinking..(trails off). Uh, so, this..and, and, music can can do it, too. You know, people have said “your music helped”.

We’ve been lucky, you know, a lot of people…I, I think Bon Jovi had people say “your music really helped me get through this”, (audience laughs) so it’s nothing…(audience laughs and applauds)…but it’s really, it’s the, it’s getting through that moment. It’s the strength of that person, maybe you’re just adding or somehow, uh, allowing them….I don’t know what, what it is, but um, but it’s that moment that uh you want to do whatever you can to get out of it (voice quiet) and reach out or put on that damn song and this is one of them for me. (Glen starts playing Song of Good Hope).”

  • ZenMaster Han

    Depression sucks

    • dbeecooks

      Does it ever! It’s absolutely horrible.

  • Backdoorman

    Of the four Grunge apostles, Cornell was the one who seemed more restrained in his excesses, even if he got his thing, I think he was the eldest and the stardom came to him in the 30s. Layne, was a conniving heroin and was vox populi. Cobain a provocateur, king of sarcasm, caught by the “horse” too and could not stand. Vedder made his own at first, could be killed on stage several times, is the most tender, only weed and alcohol … now it is matured tormented … but I do not see normal that you have to drink a bottle of wine for concert …the truth … and I am no saint …

    • Raj

      Cornell said in interviews he was high functioning alcoholic he was absolutely wasted but could go on stage and perform his ass off. Cornell self admitted he was using drugs from age 13 probably no different than Cobain, Staley or Weiland. Cornell didn’t overdose, he seemed very level headed in interviews but maybe he was carrying some weight he never revealed to anyone. I think its Vedder is the most restrained in his excesse but who knows?

      • Untitled1

        I don’t think we’ll ever crack the code that links pure creative genius to self-destructive impulses. We just have to be grateful that we had them with us as long as we did.

  • Sad and Confused

    It’s interesting that I cannot find any actual reviews of Eddie’s shows on this tour. Only talk about whether or not he mentioned Chris. What about the rest of his performance? How were the shows in London, in general? Anybody out there see any of his shows in Europe so far? If so, how was it?

    • Splinterbitch

      I read a couple of reviews on twitter, but unfortunately, I didn’t save the links or remember who the reviewers were. It seems like a couple were from music critics (I don’t know how well known or widely published) that weren’t huge fans of Pearl Jam and hadn’t seen him live before but were impressed with his show, commenting on his ability to make it feel like an intimate setting and how much he interacts with the crowd. The Pearl Jam forums have reviews from hard core fans that can’t stop raving. From the clips I’ve seen, most have been taken down from youtube now, he sounds fantastic mostly. A few songs where he isn’t quite hitting the mark but mostly his voice seems in fine form. It sounds like the shows have been emotional roller coasters, with him always managing to lift the crowd up and give them a good time when all is said and done. One show contained him messing up songs quite a few times, which the reviewer put down to his emotional state. He’s added some fan favorite songs to the setlist as he’s gone along, that are preformed with a string quartet that he ended up inviting along for the whole tour. Overall, I’ve seen nothing but good comments on twitter, instagram, etc.. from people at the shows or right after the shows.

      • Splinterbitch

        Having said that, just now saw someone on twitter who had been eagerly awaiting the show tonight say that it was underwhelming, and another that was pissed that Glen Hansard did an Irish song as part of the encore, followed by an Irish poet, which sent him toward the exit due to the “Irish nationalism bullshit”. lol

        • Sad and Confused

          Thanks for your reply SB…I guess it all depends on one’s perspective! I saw him in London in 2012 with Glen Hansard, and yes, it was one of the best shows ever. I will be seeing him in Italy in a couple of weeks. I will let you know how it goes…Apparently, at the event I am going to, he won’t actually be hitting the stage until 10:30…so I will be drinking lots of coffee before the event! Looking forward to seeing him perform with the string quartet…

  • Marcelo Ferraresso

    Sad, sad, sad. I grew up listening to these guys and I’ll listen to them up until I die. I struggle with depression since my early teens and this is not a “walk in the park”. Everyday is a fuckin’ battle…