Chris Cornell’s Children Unite With Soundgarden & Audioslave Members In Heartbreaking New Video

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Chris Cornell, his children Lily, Toni, and Christopher, and a bevy of Hollywood and music stars pledge their dedication to speak out against genocide and other human rights violations in a new PSA for The Promise campaign.

Chris Cornell released “The Promise” just a couple of months before his death last year for the film of the same name. The song has been nominated for a Grammy, and there is a campaign right now to get the song an Oscar nomination.

The clip opens with Toni, Lily, and Christopher.

“From basic human rights to women’s rights, my dad believed that if we each vow to keep one promise, we could make the world a better place,” Toni says.

Lily says, “I vow to keep the promise to protect the world’s most vulnerable youth.”

“I vow to keep that promise for my Dad,” Christopher Jr. adds.

Audioslave guitarist Tom Morello, Soundgarden drummer Matt Cameron, Tom Hanks, Barbara Streisand, Jennifer Lopez, Snoop Dogg, Serj Tankian, Elton John, Hugh Jackman, George Clooney, Jimmy Fallon, Ryan Gosling, Ozzy Osbourne, Courteney Cox, Don Cheadle, and many others also appear in the video. Watch below.

  • suz

    OH, THAT WAS LILY CORNELL!

    L I L Y C O R N E L L.

    • HippieChic61

      In the liner notes for the Audioslave s/t record, it lists the huge thing of “Thank You’s” and it lists “Susan Silver, and Lillian Silver”…not Lillian Cornell.
      Im pretty sure she goes by “cornell- Silver” now.

      • suz

        my post was to point out that neither was indicated (intentionally) and we all know for certan lily is a cornell. just notifying the unsuspecting reader of the obvious since the ‘writer’ is pro widow.

        • Trovoid

          I wonder why they cut Lily out of the YouTube video when she’s in the Twitter video.

          • suz

            because everything that is presented is a cut&paste to their (widow/bb) narrative.

          • Trovoid

            Yeah but Vicky usually at least pretends to have Lily involved in a positive light.

          • HippieChic61

            Her Mothers day tweet to Vicky would confirm they have a good relationship.

          • Trovoid

            I just wonder how much of it is for show. Everyone casts their highlight reels online. Maybe they have a great relationship, I’m not implying that I know anything. I have heard that this type of behavior was happening when Susan and Chris split up. I feel Chris’ death brought them closer together but I wouldn’t be surprised if she used to be treated at least a little bit differently than her siblings.

          • HippieChic61

            I dont see Lily making a sweet post to Vicky for show. (Im not implying that I know anything either.) From what I can see she was different from his other kids, which is common when one parent remarries. Im sure Chris loved Lily the same as he loved Toni and Christopher but it doesnt seem that she was in his life very often.

          • Trovoid

            You’re right, I doubt a kid that age would make a post about a stepmother that they dislike.

            Absolutely, I’m sure Chris loved them all equally. I’m not going to judge the situation with Lily. The way things ended with Susan, it must’ve been hard to see her. I don’t completely blame Vicky for Chris cutting out his old family and friends. A big part of it was Chris trying to start over after rehab and his divorce.

          • HippieChic61

            Thank you for not attacking Vicky! All she did was love him and her kids! Shes getting a lot of bs that she doesn’t deserve.!! I’ve been privileged to have one on one contact with her, and shes very sweet & humble regardless of what those trolling her might say 🙂

          • Trovoid

            People just don’t like her personality. I don’t blame her for his death but I’d be lying if I said some of the things she has shared and said didn’t bother me. I was confused by their marriage before he died. They didn’t seem like a match but what do I know? Chris chose her. Everyone grieves in their own ways though and I know Chris did love her. Out of curiosity, what did you talk to her about?

          • HippieChic61

            People dont know her personality, they have a preconceived hate/ jealousy for her it seems. She’s a very sweet spirit , loving mother and was a very protective wife. My conversations with her arent for sale. But current events are always a topic 🙂
            Thanks for being one of a few that can have an adult conversation on this topic.

          • Trovoid

            Obviously I don’t know what she’s like in real life but her online image has always seemed extremely superficial to me. Not that there’s anything wrong with her lifestyle but her personality and approach to life seems like the antithesis of everything Chris stood for. I think one of them did say that they were very different people. I guess opposites sometimes do attract?

            Yeah of course. I see no reason for getting aggressive with anyone unless they provoke me first. Thank you for also not spewing hatred towards me, although I expect nothing less from a self-proclaimed hippie 🙂

          • Olga Stewart

            I’m surprised that Vicky didn’t insert herself into the video.

        • HippieChic61

          I dont think anyone is questioning that she a Cornell. And regardless of whether or not youre a fan of Vicky’s, I’m pretty sure She goes by Silver.. or Cornell Silver
          Lily Silver (@lilycornellsilver) • Instagram photos and videos

        • HippieChic61
  • Olga Stewart

    I actually hope both that this song doesn’t get nominated for an Oscar and doesn’t win the Grammy.

    The reason being is that I don’t want to see Vicky up on the stage accepting another award for Chris. It will just make my sadness about Chris even worse.

    I just want Vicky to both keep quiet and go away.

    • HippieChic61

      So you cast negitivity on Chris’s project, a project he loved being a part of and was proud of just to satisfy your hatred toward Vicky! Wow, just wow!

      • Trovoid

        He’s dead so I don’t think it matters if he wins the award now. Awards mean nothing anyway. Most of us don’t want Vicky involved with Chris’ legacy. His best work was done before he met her. She has put herself in the spotlight way too often. I don’t understand why she can’t go away and grieve in private. She is going to end up like Linda Ramone, a famous widow who makes constant appearances everywhere. Not trying to start a fight with a you my flower child 🙂 I know we don’t know everything about Vicky’s life and it’s bad to make assumptions. It is fair for us to judge her behavior in the spotlight however. It speaks volumes about her.

        • HippieChic61

          We can agree to disagee 🙂
          I feel like shes being sought out for statements and articles, rather than “putting herself in the spotlight “.

          • Trovoid

            I can respect that viewpoint. I’m sure that’s at least part of it. She does use social media way too much but I suppose that’s not something I can tell someone else not to do. Thanks for staying civil!

          • HippieChic61

            Its all good, we dont have to agree to have a conversation. But it is rare on here! lol If you dont agree with some people they flip out and cant see anything other than their view.

        • Cristiann

          I think Chris did a lot of amazing work as a solo artist as well, though. Some of my personal favorite songs from him are on Euphoria Mourning, Singles, Carry On, Higher Truth, etcs.

          But I agree that it doesn’t matter much now if Chris wins a grammy/oscar or not. He isn’t alive to enjoy it, and those things weren’t super important to him anyway, so what doesn’t it matter?? It would probably make me even more sad … because then we’re unable to see him accept yet another award himself.

          • Trovoid

            Oh yeah, he definitely did. I’d have to say Euphoria Morning is my favorite solo album of his. Seasons and the whole Poncier EP showed his potential as a solo artist (and of course TOTD also gave us a glimpse of that). Higher Truth has grown on me although I don’t listen to that or Carry On that much (I don’t dislike them though). I give him props for being daring enough to try something like Scream. I blame many of the album’s shortcomings on Timbaland’s abilities.

            I personally think that his best work was from the 80s and 90s. Audioslave was great but some of it is a bit too formulaic (Chris even said that, I think). I can’t believe how many great albums he put out in the 90s. TOTD, Badmotorfinger, Superunknown, DOTU, and Euphoria Morning. That was all in one decade! So yeah in my opinion, he did his best work before meeting Vicky.

            I will say though that the way his songwriting and voice matured was admirable. I think he adjusted well in the spotlight as he aged. His lower register became more soulful and his pitch became more consistent. He had a huge catalog to play in a stripped down environment and did a good job balancing Soundgarden and his solo work. Maybe he thought his career was over but I still think he had a lot of offer the world.

          • Cristiann

            Maybe my opinion is a little bit biased because I was first introduced to Chris through his solo work (I actually didn’t get into Soundgarden or Audioslave until afterwards). Euphoria Mourning is my favorite solo album of his as well. His solo work in general is so good and underrated imo. I think Chris really found his solo identity around the time he was making Songbook — I especially love the acoustic live shows he did.

            I don’t really think Vicky (or even Susan, who was actually Soundgarden’s manager during the 80s/90s) had much to do with the creative process of Chris’ music tbh. I think the reason why some of his songs/albums are better than others is because of who he collaborated with on them. I agree about Scream — I love that he was willing to step outside of his comfort zone and tried something different, but that album (despite having some great songs like Ground Zero, Scream, Long Gone) might have been better with a different collaborator.

            Yeah, the 80s/90s were definitely the “glory days” but like you said, Chris had so much more to offer. All throughout his career he wrote beautiful music and gave such great shows. Even on demos (like Flutter Girl — that’s one of my favorites) his voice was powerful and soulful.

          • Trovoid

            That’s what’s great about Chris’ music. It seems everyone has different introductions and preferences to his catalog.

            Just to clarify, I agree that neither of his spouses had a lot to do with his creative output (although every artist is influenced by their partner to an extent). I think his evolution was just a matter of getting older, lifestyle changes, wanting to try new things, collaborators, etc.. I guess I can appreciate Susan doing interviews like she did with Hype because she was managing the band and was there during the whole explosion with the scene. I just don’t think Vicky should be a spokesperson for his musical contributions. It seems like the music world is foreign to her minus her work as a publicist. I’m not trying to disrespect her or anything but I’d rather hear about Chris from the guys in Soundgarden/Audioslave, Alain Johannes, or any of their peers like Pearl Jam.

            Obviously nobody can destroy someone’s legacy but I’d rather not associate some of the music that has changed my life with a social media addicted widow that is sharing very personal details about their lives constantly. You can’t tell someone how to grieve though and I guess this is all just part of living in the digital age.

          • Cristiann

            Oh, definitely. And there’s so much in his catalog to choose from. Just out of curiosity, how were you introduced to Chris’ music? 🙂

            I agree — Susan managed Soundgarden (and Alice In Chains) during the “grunge” explosion, and she actually knows a lot about the music industry, so it only makes sense for her to talk about that experience. Vicky, on the other hand, not so much. I actually feel like she focuses a little too much on “The Promise” tbh. But yeah, I would much rather hear Chris’ fellow band mates and past collaborators discuss his music instead of her.

            Believe me, I understand the addiction — I often check the articles on this site too, but lately I’ve been trying to avoid the ones featuring Vicky (or worse … her mother). I mean, I know she’s the widow; I know she was a big part of his life, so naturally she a lot to say (some things would’ve been better left unsaid, though). I wish she didn’t put herself out there in the spotlight so much either. But like you said, we can’t tell others how to grieve.

            These days I just try to keep my focus on Chris’ music and all the great moments he gave us. It only makes me sadder if I pay too much attention to the drama going on in his family.

          • Trovoid

            I discovered Soundgarden coincidentally right around when they got back together in 2010 (I’m only in my twenties, so I wasn’t around for their younger years). I remember putting their music on an iPod because I was trying to get into a bunch of other music at the time. I was familiar with a lot of other bands already so I figured I should check out a few Soundgarden songs. I heard a couple songs off Badmotorfinger and watched a few videos online and was immediately hooked. I was obsessed with his voice. His look and stage presence caught my attention but his vocal range, tone and power are what drew me in initially. Temple of the Dog and Badmotorfinger were basically the first albums of his that I listened to over and over again.

            I worked my way through the rest of Soundgarden’s discography (in a random order). I read and watched every single one of their interviews I could find, listened to every bootleg, b-side, live concert.. You name it. Once I started reading Chris’ lyrics and learned about his personality, it made the songs even more intriguing to me. I honestly have never felt so similar to a person, especially one that I never met. I spent years and years obsessed with his music. Discovering him influenced me as a musician more than anyone in the world. He inspired me as a human being too; that it was possible to break out of depression and anxiety and create a life for yourself while remaining an authentic person. His suicide has honestly left me with the feeling that I’m screwed. I still think about it every day.

            I didn’t mean to write such a long post! It’s just nice to speak with people who are as moved by his music as I am. There aren’t many people I’ve met who appreciate his songs and voice the same way.

            I guess I need willpower!! My curiosity causes me to click all of those horrible family member articles. By the way, is your name pronounced like Cristi-ann? In writing it reminded me of the song Kristi. How did you get into Chris’ music?

          • Cristiann

            “He inspired me as a human being too; that it was possible to overcome mental health issues and create a life for yourself while remaining an authentic person. His suicide has honestly left me with the feeling that I’m screwed. I think about it every day.” — honestly, same here. I see so much of myself in Chris too (whether in personality or in his lyrics); his songs are still so comforting and relatable to me because they made me realize that I’m not the only one struggling with depression. His death really shook me, though … because I just didn’t think his life would end that way. It just devastates me that he had no hope of things ever getting better. And it scares me because … what if I end up the same way? His death has made me realize the seriousness of depression. I know I need to get professional help, but making big changes in your life isn’t easy.

            It’s awesome that you were able to see one of his acoustic shows. I wasn’t that lucky, but that’s okay. I’m grateful to just be able to listen to him. I got into Chris’ music in 2006 when he released “You know my name” on Casino Royal. At the time Carry On hadn’t come out yet and he only had one solo album out (plus a few other soundtrack contributions like “Seasons” & “Sunshower”), so I heard all that stuff first. Then I slowly moved on to Soundgarden by starting with Superunknown (I got hooked almost right away and continued listening to the rest of their discography), then I moved on to Audioslave and Temple of the Dog (I ended up loving those bands too). Honestly, I can’t think of many artists who would consistently put out great work like Chris did. I even love so many of Soundgarden’s b-sides, band covers (their version of Come Together is AMAZING) and other demo versions of his songs.

            I still love watching Chris’ interviews (especially ones from the 00s because he’s not so shy in those) because they give us an insight into his mind and thoughts about a lot of things. I love watching many of his concerts (even in the early days Soundgarden was so impressive) and I love hearing those random stories Chris would tell during his acoustic shows. I never even met or knew Chris … but I miss him. I wish I had appreciated him more while he was alive.

            I’m in my late twenties, so I wasn’t able to experience the “grunge” era either, but sometimes I wish I had because I love so much of the music that came from that time. And yes, that’s exactly how you pronounce it — Cristi-ann (Kristi is another rare SG gem imo). Most people get my name wrong and I hate that, lol. Oh, please don’t be sorry, I love talking about this stuff too. It’s very rare for me to be able to talk about music in general (much less with others who appreciate music I love), so this has been fun. 🙂

          • Trovoid

            I have also put off getting professional help. I’ve made attempts here and there but it’s scary to commit, you know? I’m wary of medication and therapy. Sometimes it’s as if I’ve made peace with my mental health issues. It’s like they’ve become a big part of my identity and personality and I’m convinced that they’ll never go away. Or sometimes I feel like I’m not mentally ill but I’m just seeing the world for how terrible it truly is.

            Thanks for sharing 🙂 I miss Chris too and have thought a lot of the exact same things as you. I would totally be your friend in real life and listen to all that’s going on with you. It sounds like we are dealing with similar obstacles in life. Much love to you.

            Cristi, tell me what I wanna hear
            Cristi, show me what I wanna see 🙂

          • Cristiann

            It really is scary and I have my own concerns about medication/therapy as well. Mainly because I already have to take lots of medicine for other (physical) health issues, so I wouldn’t want to have to take more, you know? I’m always wary of new medical treatments (especially if they may have negative side effects on me). But I heard somewhere that if I just see a psychologist then they can’t prescribe me any meds for depression, so I can just talk to them. My family would probably judge me if they found out I was getting professional help, though. I don’t know … I’m still trying to figure out what I should do. I know I need to break out of these bad habits but … ugh, it’s not easy.

            Aww, no problem 🙂 it’s nice to be able to talk to someone about all this stuff. I’d love to have a friend like you in real life. I hope we can talk more in the future. Much love to you as well.

            ♥️

          • Trovoid

            Ahh, I don’t blame you. I’m always worried that I’ll be the guy to get every single side effect. I feel like I can be really sensitive to the things I put in my body. Yeah, if you go to a psychologist then they can’t force you to do anything; only suggest ideas. I can’t believe there are families in this day and age that would judge someone for getting mental health help! Just because it’s happening in our heads doesn’t make it any less real than a physical illness. I know it’s not easy. It’s tough to ignore the inner voice that’s always critiquing you and it can be extremely difficult to make changes.

            It is nice and I wish the same. I really hope you see better days, we deserve nothing less. Absolutely, I’d love to talk to you again. I’m on here a lot because I have no life so say hello if you see me. You’re a sweetheart.

          • Cristiann

            “Just because it’s happening in our heads doesn’t make it any less real than a physical illness. In fact, it is a physical illness in many ways.” — I agree, but you’d be surprised by how many people don’t understand or believe that. I’m not sure why … sometimes I think it might be a generational thing, or maybe some people are just conditioned to think that it’s better to repress all these feelings instead of actually getting mental health help (I think in my family’s case it’s a combination of both). It’s hard to believe but some still think that depression is a choice and that we could all be happy if we really just tried. Ugh, I wish it were that simple but it’s not. Who would ever choose to be depressed?? People are so ignorant sometimes. Society as a whole should be more understanding and patient with those struggling with mental illnesses.

            Thank you, it’s nice to know that we’re not completely alone in this. I have no life either, so I’ll definitely be saying hello again. Lol 🙂
            So are you <3

          • Trovoid

            I think it is a generational thing. Look at how many 90s musicians reached some sort of tragic fate. Their parents didn’t believe in mental illness. Many of them didn’t even get divorces at the time. It seems like everything was stigmatized. People like Chris Cornell, Scott Weiland, Layne Staley, Kurt Cobain, etc.. grew up with a skewed perception on what family is along with a denial of their own mental health problems.. People are still uneducated about it and there’s a badge of shame that comes along with it (especially if you’re a man).

            Right? Who would ever choose to be depressed?

            I read that depression may have something to do with a gene linked to an overactive immune system, which causes inflammation. It had an evolutionary benefit back in the day to help us fight off infections. Stress can be thought of as an allergen, causing all sorts of physical and mental issues in the process. If you’re interested at all:

            https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/10/the-evolutionary-advantage-of-depression/263124/

          • Cristiann

            My thoughts exactly. Sometimes I feel guilty for being this way, you know? Like, I don’t have a right to feel depressed because there are so many people in the world who’s problems seem more important than mine. I struggled with depression for years before I even knew what it actually was … it’s just not something we talk about in my family. And since they don’t think of it as a real illness, they also don’t think it’s serious enough to get treatment for. The shame, stigma and ignorance that surrounds mental illness are still some of the biggest problems today. So many people are taught to deny/hide that they have a problem and as a result we don’t get the help that we need.

            Yes, boys are usually taught to just “suck it up and be a man” — they aren’t encouraged to show vulnerability even now, so I can only imagine just how bad it was for those guys in the 90s. But the thing about Chris is that he always showed vulnerability in his lyrics and often spoke openly about depression. That’s what crushes me and often makes me wonder what went wrong. Maybe he felt that (like many of us) he could handle those problems on his own and maybe he didn’t want his kids to worry about him. It’s all so sad.

            Wow, I didn’t know about that. Thanks for sending me the link — I will go read it now.

          • Trovoid

            I feel the same guilt at times. Look at it this way though: If that were true then wouldn’t that mean that nobody should be happy because there are people out there doing better than them? I know. I denied it myself for years, thinking it was just “teen angst.” Then I realized I never grew out of it and it slowly got more and more debilitating.

            Chris’ vulnerability was so inspiring. I agree, I think he felt obligated to stay strong for everyone.

          • Trovoid

            I feel the same guilt at times. Look at it this way though: If that were true then wouldn’t that mean that nobody should be happy because there are people out there doing better than them? I know. I denied it myself for years, thinking it was just “teen angst.” Then I realized I never grew out of it and it slowly got more and more debilitating. I thought depression and anxiety were bad enough but after high school all sorts of wacky things started happening to me. I think I probably have at least 5-10 mental illnesses/personality disorders. They tend to go hand in hand.

            Chris’ vulnerability was so inspiring. I agree, I think he felt obligated to stay strong for everyone.

          • Trovoid

            I feel the same guilt at times. Look at it this way though: If that were true then wouldn’t that mean that nobody should be happy because there are people out there doing better than them? I know. I denied it myself for years, thinking it was just “teen angst.” Then I realized I never grew out of it and it slowly got more and more debilitating. I thought depression and anxiety were bad enough but after high school all sorts of wacky things started happening to me. I think I probably have at least 5-10 mental illnesses/personality disorders. They tend to go hand in hand. Don’t feel bad about getting help. At the same time, I don’t blame you for being hesitant. I really do wish I would’ve spoken up as a child once the underlying symptoms started showing up.

            Chris’ vulnerability was so inspiring. I agree, I think he felt obligated to stay strong for everyone.

            If you’re ever feeling like things are spiraling out of control, talk to me. I’m unfortunately very familiar with what it’s like to feel completely hopeless.

          • Cristiann

            That’s a very good point. I guess that’s something a lot of us are taught to do — pretend that things really aren’t that bad. People will ask you “how’re you doing?”, but you won’t tell them the truth … you’ll just say “I’m fine” because (most of the time) that’s what they expect to hear. It’s just so exhausting to pretend you’re doing okay when you aren’t.

            I often feel that I have to be ‘strong’ for my family as well (any crying has to be done when I’m alone and I spend lots of time alone). I wish my mother wouldn’t take my depression so personally. It’s like I have to protect her from my own pain and struggles. She doesn’t have the patient to listen to me when I need to talk, but she also doesn’t like the idea of me talking to someone else about this stuff. Ugh :/ I don’t know what to do anymore.

            It’s just really hard sometimes, you know? I wish these things were okay to talk about with more people. You actually understand what I’m going through, so I feel safe enough to open up here. This probably sounds silly but I wish I could give you a hug. Thanks again for listening to me and please know that you can always talk to me as well. ♥️

          • Trovoid

            It is very exhausting to pretend that you’re okay. It has made me dread every job that I’ve had. I’d much rather stay at home where I don’t have to put on an act and can just be my sad, lonely self!

            I know what you mean. I feel like when you tell family or friends how you’re feeling they get frustrated or don’t understand. And yet people always act like they’re there to listen. I feel like nobody in the world wants to listen to someone vent (except empathic people going through similar experiences). People are so full of it. Wow that makes me sad. Nobody should be discouraged like that. I know therapy and doctors can cost a lot depending on insurance and location in the U.S. but beyond that there’s nothing wrong with those options! Don’t you believe that. Mental illness is so tough, I’ve even convinced myself that therapists don’t want to hear it. I worry that they don’t genuinely care that much (probably because of how the rest of the world treats us). I think it’s hard for us to accept that we need help because we think we’re flawed. None of this is your fault at all. Don’t forget how strong you are. We never asked for these chemical imbalances and we carry on anyhow; even when things seem completely bleak.

            I know it’s hard. I wish the same, which is why I probably just wrote that huge paragraph. Holding it all in for years and years starts to really take a toll on you. It’s nice to remember that we’re not alone or crazy. Not silly at all, I feel like I admire you just just through your words. Your writing style and the way you think really resonates with me and I feel a sense of familiarity. ♥️ Thank you.

          • Cristiann

            Yeah, many people don’t seem to realize how hard it can be to function ‘normally’ when you’re depressed. Mental illnesses really do drain so much out of you — like, just doing simple everyday things can be difficult and tiring. Sometimes I don’t even have the energy to get out of bed, much less pretend to be cheerful for the sake of others. At least when I’m alone I don’t have to pretend to be anything except myself.

            Exactly — they really are so full of it. How many people actually mean it when they say that they’re there to listen to you?? Only empathetic people going through something similar, like you said. I’ve never even met you and yet you’ve actually allowed me to vent (and without judging me too). I love my family more than anything, but they never really ‘listen’ to me and sometimes that’s all that I need. Not every problem in life has a solution but we should still be allowed to talk about it. Sometimes just talking about this stuff helps because it lifts a bit of the emotional weight off. I can’t afford to pay for a psychologist myself and I’m not 100% sure if my medical insurance can cover that. It’s something I definitely have to keep thinking about.

            Aww, you’re so sweet. You don’t know how much these kind words mean to me. I really admire your strength and courage as well. Honestly, the world needs more good people like you in it. ♥️ {big hugs}

          • Trovoid

            I think that is the problem. A lot of people try to give advice or some sort of practical solution and can’t seem to understand that you just need someone to talk to. It really makes it seems like we’re a burden on society. Yeah, it’s a shame about health care and how many people can’t afford to get help (or have to wait a while to get an appointment for a psychiatrist).

            I’m really glad that my words mean a lot. You are such a doll, I would absolutely love spending time with a girl like you. You love good music, seem kind and intelligent. What’s not to love? 🙂

          • Cristiann

            My thoughts exactly. If we want people to stop dying from mental illnesses, then we need to start making it okay to talk about. Hopefully one day we can all speak more openly about this stuff and be able to do it without shame.

            Aww, don’t make me blush lol … thanks, that’s very sweet of you to say. You seem like a pretty lovable guy as well. Talking with you has been really wonderful. 🙂