Billy Corgan Reveals What He Really Thinks About Tool

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Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan discussed Tool, Bad Brain, Vanilla Ice, and Pink Floyd in recent Instagram story Q&A’s.

Opinions on Tool as a band?

“Massive respect. Singular band.”

How do you feel about HR from Bad Brains?

“Genius. True innovator.”

Have you ever met Vanilla Ice?

“Have not.”

Any Pink Floyd covers in the future?

“We tried ‘Welcome to the Machine’ for this tour.”

Corgan discussed being a father to his son Augustus Juppiter in a new Instagram post.

“I love this photo. It makes me want to discuss something that I am no expert in (parenting), but first I’d like to point out what I see when I gaze at Augustus here, tinkling on the ivories. So, in a stream of consciousness: he is confident, sitting upright, and he is welcome to the instrument, but he also knows that it is not a toy which is why Augustus looks so serious. It’s also worth pointing out that this photo was taken at the home of @pawschicago founder Paula Fasseas, and there’s nothing staged here. My son asked to play the piano for everyone, and this is the result. When he was very small (about 2 months) I’d sit him on my lap and show him that if he struck the keys it would make a sound. What sound, how hard he hit, I told him, what not important. Just that he had the choice, and over time we have tweaked that a bit, like ‘no piano before 8 AM, please.’ And that striking the keys too hard doesn’t make for the most pleasant sound.

For when I was little I wasn’t allowed to touch any piano I came in contact with. And the penalty for such was to be rapped on the knuckles, or have the piano lid slammed shut over those same fingers, being told in no uncertain terms that the instrument was forbidden. I’d beg for 5 mins freedom, or sneak to it when no one was home, but being a guilty pleasure I associated my rare moments at the helm with the committing of a crime.

Which brings me to my parenting. Based on life experience, I am in absolute poverty as to how to teach from a place of love, or with patience. Of course I do my best. And understand it’s a child’s providence to challenge authority (I welcome it, in fact; after all, my son is a Corgan). But I’d tell you I know more from 70’s TV on what is appropriate child rearing than the examples my elders set. For anything good came with a horrific price, and it’s quite obvious it took me years to navigate the damage of that cost. And the reason I’m saying this is twofold: I know there are many, many people in my same position, or (for those who aren’t parents) you need to nurture the broken child in you. Or you want a closer relationship to your pet(s). So let’s wade in to those waters, and soon.”

I love this photo. It makes me want to discuss something that I am no expert in (parenting), but first I'd like to point out what I see when I gaze at Augustus here, tinkling on the ivories. So, in a stream of consciousness: he is confident, sitting upright, and he is welcome to the instrument, but he also knows that it is not a toy which is why Augustus looks so serious. It's also worth pointing out that this photo was taken at the home of @pawschicago founder Paula Fasseas, and there's nothing staged here. My son asked to play the piano for everyone, and this is the result. When he was very small (about 2 months) I'd sit him on my lap and show him that if he struck the keys it would make a sound. What sound, how hard he hit, I told him, what not important. Just that he had the choice, and over time we have tweaked that a bit, like 'no piano before 8 AM, please.' And that striking the keys too hard doesn't make for the most pleasant sound. For when I was little I wasn't allowed to touch any piano I came in contact with. And the penalty for such was to be rapped on the knuckles, or have the piano lid slammed shut over those same fingers, being told in no uncertain terms that the instrument was forbidden. I'd beg for 5 mins freedom, or sneak to it when no one was home, but being a guilty pleasure I associated my rare moments at the helm with the committing of a crime. Which brings me to my parenting. Based on life experience, I am in absolute poverty as to how to teach from a place of love, or with patience. Of course I do my best. And understand it's a child's providence to challenge authority (I welcome it, in fact; after all, my son is a Corgan). But I'd tell you I know more from 70's TV on what is appropriate child rearing than the examples my elders set. For anything good came with a horrific price, and it's quite obvious it took me years to navigate the damage of that cost. And the reason I'm saying this is twofold: I know there are many, many people in my same position, or (for those who aren't parents) you need to nurture the broken child in you. Or you want a closer relationship to your pet(s). So let's wade in to those waters, and soon.

A post shared by WilliamPatrickCorgan (@williampcorgan) on

  • Džizus Krajstović

    Another huge revelation by Alternative Nation.